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Borders in contemporary Macedonia
Rozita Dimova

8 Materialities of displacement: borders in contemporary Macedonia Rozita Dimova The 246 km long border between the Republic of Macedonia (hereinafter Macedonia) and Greece sets off at Lake Prespa, crosses the fertile Pelagonia valley, runs across the steep mountainous wedges of the Nidze and Kozuf mountains, cuts short the valley of the river Vardar, and ends north of the Dojran Lake in eastern Macedonia (see Figure 8.1). The two countries are connected by three border crossings: Medzitlija-Niki near the towns of Bitola-Florina, Bogorodica-Evzoni near

in The political materialities of borders
New theoretical directions

Materiality has long been tied to the political projects of nationalism and capitalism. But how are we to rethink borders in this context? Is the border the limit where the capitalist nation-state, contested and re-created at its centre, becomes fixed? Or is it something else? Is the border something, or does it instead do things? This volume brings questions of materiality to bear specifically on the study of borders. These questions address specifically the shift from ontology to process in thinking about borders. The political materialities of borders does not presume the material aspect of borders but rather explores the ways in which any such materiality comes into being. Through ethnographic and philosophical explorations of the ontology of borders and its limitations from the perspective of materiality, this volume seeks to throw light on the interaction between the materiality of state borders and the non-material aspects of state-making. This enables a new understanding of borders as productive of the politics of materiality, on which both the state project rests, including its multifarious forms in the post-nation-state era.

Open Access (free)
Ash dieback and plant biosecurity in Britain
Judith Tsouvalis

11 Monstrous materialities: ash dieback and plant biosecurity in Britain Judith Tsouvalis The aim of the edited volume Science and the politics of openness is to raise awareness of the double-sided controversial nature of initiatives aimed at improving relations between science, policymaking, politics and publics. Efforts have been made to strengthen public trust in expert knowledge. These include dialogues organised between scientists and concerned publics on contentious, ethically complex issues, inviting specific publics to help decide the trajectories of

in Science and the politics of openness
Olga Demetriou

2 Materiality, imbrication, and the longue durée of Greco-Turkish borders Olga Demetriou Borders are irreducibly material structures. Even when they refer to non-material categories (e.g. difference, mental borders, disciplinary boundaries) the image conjured up to conceptualize these is that of a state border, drawn as a line on a map and policed with people and infrastructure on the ground. And yet attempts to understand these precise borders in their materiality have shown time and again in border studies that this ‘line’ is a ruse, that the more we take

in The political materialities of borders
Keith Mc Loughlin

-based deterrent. Despite prominent disarmament activists, such as Mary Kaldor and E.P. Thompson, continuing to alert the public to the dangers of military industry, CND reverted to type at a critical period when the threat of war coincided with the reality of mass unemployment. These last two chapters make the case that the unique opportunity to fuse ‘materialist’ and ‘moral’ arguments was lost. Living in a material world In 1968 Frank Parkin, a sociologist at the University of Kent, published his first academic

in The British left and the defence economy
1980–2000
Dominique Marshall

of information about development in Canadian schools during that period offer the historian a significant opportunity to study practical and ideological traditions of visual communications for pedagogical purposes among humanitarian agencies. The focus of historical inquiries of visual media is often on the content produced and the intended audience, with limited examination of those responsible for the logistics and pedagogical dimensions of the distribution of the materials. This article discusses the following aspects of the practices of CIDA: the purpose of

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Visual Advocacy in the Early Decades of Humanitarian Cinema
Valérie Gorin

testimonial function of the films in humanitarian publications and promotional material and discusses the idea that ‘seeing is believing’. Following on that, the link between visual evidence and affects is addressed, as humanitarian cinema allowed contact with suffering that was more intimate. Finally, the immediacy of the cinema technology and its induced immersive spectacle is analysed, to question the perceptual experience of the films’ settings with the production of eyewitness images and first-hand accounts during the screenings. The paper concludes by highlighting the

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Governing Precarity through Adaptive Design
Mark Duffield

political change, vulnerability becomes a direct or unmediated experience characteristic of the life-world of the person concerned. Just as important as material aid, if not more so, is fast access to sympathetic value-added information. With design having supplanted politics within the post-humanitarian canon, the discursive field is bounded by the interplay between the empathy of the onlooker or practitioner and the direct experience of the affected. 10 The aim is no longer to control or contain disasters – it’s more about improving how they

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
An Interview with Rainer Schlösser, Spokesperson of the Association of the Red Cross Museums in Germany (Arbeitsgemeinschaft der deutschen Rotkreuz-Museen)
Sönke Kunkel

should mention that the museum is also a collecting institution. That’s something that many people tend to overlook: as a museum, we collect, store, and archive parts of the material and written record of the Red Cross. So we also have a library which serves researchers. SK: Ah, that’s interesting. So you’re involved in a wide spectrum of activities. Still I am wondering somewhat about, let’s say, the general significance of the institution of the Red Cross museum. Isn’t there something old-fashioned and outdated about museums in this world of online communication

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Valérie Gorin and Sönke Kunkel

figure to overcome the politics of borders ( Johnson, 2011 ; Malkki, 1996 ; Rajaram, 2002 ), or the contribution of visual media to ideologies embedded in humanitarian narratives, from the human rights framework to colonialism, nationalism, and imperialism ( Briggs, 2003 ; Dogra, 2012 ; Lydon, 2016 ; Sliwinski, 2011 ). In this special issue, we build on such scholarship by inquiring into the role that specific media such as photography, film, graphic materials, or museums

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs