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Sex, Catholicism and women in post-war England
Author: David Geiringer

On 25 July 1968, Pope Paul VI shook the world. His encyclical letter Humanae Vitae rejected widespread calls to permit use of the contraceptive pill and deemed artificial contraception ‘intrinsically evil’. The Catholic Church is now commonly identified as the antagonist in a story of sixties sexual revolution – a stubborn stone resisting the stream of sex-positive modernity. There has been little consideration of how Catholic women themselves experienced this period of cultural upheaval. This book is about the sexual and religious lives of Catholic women in post-war England. It uses original oral history material to uncover the way Catholic women negotiated spiritual and sexual demands at a moment when the two increasingly seemed at odds with one another. The book also examines the public pronouncements and secretive internal documents of the central Catholic Church, offering a ground-breaking new explanation of the Pope’s decision to prohibit the pill. The materials gathered here provide a fresh perspective on the idea that ‘sex killed God’, reframing dominant approaches to the histories of sex, religion and modernity. The memories of Catholic women help us understand why religious belief does not structure the lives of most English men and women today in the way it did at the close of the Second World War, why sex holds a place of such significance in our modern culture, and crucially, how these two developments related to one another. The book will be essential reading for not only scholars of sexuality, religion, gender and oral history, but anyone interested in post-war social change.

Writing the history of Manchester’s Collegiate Church and Cathedral

successive foundations, providing both originals and translations (and noting that the 1791 edition of the charters had ‘some very bad translations’). 25 Hibbert-Ware acknowledged that much of the underpinning source material for his research had been collected by John Greswell, the schoolmaster at Chetham’s who had been working on the College’s history before he died in 1781; when Hibbert-Ware first agreed to take on the task of writing the history he believed he would be just finishing off Greswell’s work, only to find

in Manchester Cathedral
Abstract only
Eric Pudney

the same order as the published version, there are whole sections of the printed book that appear not to have been included in the draft. It seems likely that at least some of these sections were added after the draft was sent to its anonymous respondent, although some material may have appeared later in the draft version, since the treatise in its current state ends abruptly in the middle of reason 108. Table 2 Reasons in the treatise and corresponding sections in the Discoverie . Reason(s) Corresponding book/chapter in Discoverie Topics

in A defence of witchcraft belief
Michael Carter-Sinclair

-to-door salesmen, but this first phase of real power could make them feel that they were on the way to further and bigger victories. 8 For the moment, Christian Social control offered those with the right connections the prospect of jobs with the city and its municipal enterprises. Support for ‘appropriate’ businesses might come through the awarding of contracts for public works. Even if there was no likelihood of the repeal of the 1874 laws on religion, marriage and education, the Church too might find material support, at a time when it was seeking funds for a relatively

in Vienna’s ‘respectable’ antisemites
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Elliot Vernon

the civil wars. These clandestine measures can be contrasted with the London presbyterians, whose representation in the upper echelons of the Stationers’ Company and near-hegemony of the licensing process meant that presbyterians had little difficulty in getting their voice heard in public. Nevertheless, in the various crises of the late 1640s and 1650s presbyterian stationers and ministers also reverted to anonymous printed material to make their case against their adversaries. The effect of the wide use of print was to

in London presbyterians and the British revolutions, 1638–64

seemed unimaginable, by then the Cathedral had emerged from the shadows of Manchester’s industrial past and reinvented itself as the public face of the city. Physically and materially, this was a journey from obscurity to new urban space, but paradoxically it cut across the arc of church decline in Manchester. The Cathedral managed to reconceive itself, and to assert its continuing role, at a time when the difficulties facing all the traditional Christian denominations were becoming more entrenched, and more

in Manchester Cathedral
Michael Carter-Sinclair

-assurance. When Deckert took over at Weinhaus, he addressed some immediate material issues. He founded a charity for the benefit of poor local children. He took on the problem that no real church building existed. Instead, part of the Czartoryski family chateau had doubled as the place of worship. So, Deckert set about raising funds for the construction of a new church, his campaign beginning with sixty contributing members. 40 By now Deckert had a significant public profile, at least in Catholic circles. He had already been appointed by Rauscher as ‘protector’ of the 1

in Vienna’s ‘respectable’ antisemites
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of the east wall of the St John the Baptist chapel, the whole of the Ely chapel (attached to the north side of the St John the Baptist chapel), the roof of the chapter house, and other parts of the building on the north and east sides. The damage was repaired under the Cathedral architect, Sir Hubert Worthington. Following from this general outline, the surviving fabric and archival material allow a picture of the church to be built up. Illustrations of the west tower before it was replaced in 1862–68 show

in Manchester Cathedral
Michael Carter-Sinclair

position in Austrian society. Brunner was not above appealing to the material interests of those who might be converted into supporters of the Church, even when mocking those who, he suggested, scorned religion: ‘If you, the rich, find belief in the true God to be risible then, in the same way, proletarians will be highly amused by your belief in the legal right to your possessions.’ 41 It is a matter of interpretation as to whether Brunner should be described as realistic or cynical in making a call for those who had no faith in religion to fall in with the Church

in Vienna’s ‘respectable’ antisemites
Michael Carter-Sinclair

were also issued late in 1915 for participation in ‘patriotic war metal collections,’ including gathering church bells. 48 They would continue to be issued further into the war. 49 These were attempts to find solutions to material shortages in metals, but the big fear was that food would run out and, in November 1915, this seemed to be happening in one part of the Empire – Galicia. The Pope, responding to a request from the Polish bishops, issued a call for all Catholics to join together ‘for the destitute people of Poland,’ whether this be in the partitions

in Vienna’s ‘respectable’ antisemites