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Abstract only
Jack Mosse

If finance and politics both disseminate a myth of the economy that feeds into the notion of it as something akin to a pot of money, then the only place that could challenge this elite vision is the media. Indeed, one of the key roles the media is meant to play in modern democracies is to act as a counterbalance to the elite powers explored in the previous two chapters (big business and the state). In democratic theory there are three overlapping roles the media is supposed to play: 1) to inform the public about the world

in The pound and the fury
Abstract only
Kamal Ramburuth-Hurt

to organise economies. In this section we explore how this might be achieved in local and national government, the media, corporate governance, new economy movements, international economic institutions and international NGOs in turn. Government The two main approaches to economic policy in the twentieth century have

in Reclaiming economics for future generations

The well-being of Europe’s citizens depends less on individual consumption and more on their social consumption of essential goods and services – from water and retail banking to schools and care homes – in what we call the foundational economy. Individual consumption depends on market income, while foundational consumption depends on social infrastructure and delivery systems of networks and branches, which are neither created nor renewed automatically, even as incomes increase. This historically created foundational economy has been wrecked in the last generation by privatisation, outsourcing, franchising and the widespread penetration of opportunistic and predatory business models. The distinctive, primary role of public policy should therefore be to secure the supply of basic services for all citizens (not a quantum of economic growth and jobs). Reconstructing the foundational has to start with a vision of citizenship that identifies foundational entitlements as the conditions for dignified human development, and likewise has to depend on treating the business enterprises central to the foundational economy as juridical persons with claims to entitlements but also with responsibilities and duties. If the aim is citizen well-being and flourishing for the many not the few, then European politics at regional, national and EU level needs to be refocused on foundational consumption and securing universal minimum access and quality. If/when government is unresponsive, the impetus for change has to come from engaging citizens locally and regionally in actions which break with the top down politics of ‘vote for us and we will do this for you’.

Abstract only
Jack Mosse

words?). Both in the media and in everyday conversations, statements that would have been common place 30–40 years ago are now condemned and can rightly cause those making them to lose their jobs, or to be dropped from a social circle. Language has taken on a significance it didn't previously have; it is recognised as something that shapes our world, and as something that can be as harmful as a physical weapon. Going further back, we can see that hand in hand with this recognition of the power of language has been a movement towards exposing the

in The pound and the fury
Seeking a new solution
Costas Simitis

increasingly apparent, both at home and abroad, that reform fatigue had taken its toll. Efforts appeared absent of conviction, courage or structure. The annual statement of the Bank of Greece for 2011 indicated ‘a strong re-evaluation of the efforts [was necessary]…. The deficits, mainly of the broader public sector, had not been brought under control and the reforms that were legislated for, remained on paper [only].’ 8 Media reports were indicating that the European Commission felt that the target of returning Greece to the markets in 2012 was now impossible; it was in

in The European debt crisis
Jonathan Michie

for professional football in Britain – and subsequently increasingly of the market for the broadcasting rights for professional football, including for pay-TV in the form of both subscription channels and pay-per-view on an individual match basis – have thus been purposively constructed. Over time, it has also been deliberately changed, significantly, under the influence of internal and external pressures on the game. This has taken the form of the richer clubs breaking away from the existing league structure to create their own ‘Premier’ league. It has seen media

in Market relations and the competitive process
Abstract only
Mike Buckle and John Thompson

Union, with uncertain consequences for both the regulation and the operations of the financial system. Further change will continue to take place and the interested reader is recommended to keep abreast of developments by reading the financial reports in the quality press and other media. 17.2   Critique of the financial sector We saw in chapter 2

in The UK financial system (fifth edition)
Abstract only
Joe Earle, Cahal Moran, and Zach Ward-Perkins

appeared in the media giving opinions about the health of the economy and predicting how this event or that policy would affect it. These men (and it is mostly men) were confident and authoritative and their opinions were respected. They conversed with each other using jargon, graphs 2  The econocracy and statistics which made them difficult to understand. We felt that to understand and shape the world we needed to speak their language and that’s how we all ended up studying economics in the same year at the University of Manchester in 2011. After that it felt like we

in The econocracy
Costas Simitis

intent indicating that ‘the Europeans will not let Greece fail’ would suffice ‘to discourage the markets from harmful speculation. It was very possible that in such a case financial support would not even be needed for Greece.’4 On 11 February 2010 an (informal) EU summit was to take place. The President of the European Council, Herman Van Rompuy, was to propose a plan ‘for a European strategy for growth and employment’. Events changed the agenda. The Greek crisis became the central issue.5 Media coverage, various statements from ministers of finance and broader

in The European debt crisis
Constituting the cultural economy
Fran Tonkiss

. The effect of such a ‘production of culture’, what is more, is not simply to re-frame certain ideas, expressive forms and aesthetic goods in commodity terms, but also to frame potential markets for them (cf. Callon, 1998). In the context of new media, Pratt (2000, p. 427) suggests that business start-ups are concerned not simply to find a niche in some broadly identifiable market, but simultaneously to ‘imagine a market, a niche, and a product’. Supply and demand are ‘co-constructed’ (Callon, 2002) through the qualification and ‘singularisation’ of goods, and the

in Market relations and the competitive process