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Jenny Pickerill

5 Electronic tactics and digital alternative media One of the key potential uses of CMC, in addition to its use for mobilisation and co-ordination of activism, is as a tool of protest in itself. CMC could be used for more than the distribution of information, notably as a tool with which to lobby adversaries, undertake ‘hacktivism’ or as a conduit for alternative media. Environmental activists have utilised diverse tactics in the attempt to assert their influence upon the decision-making process and society. Such tactics have included lobbying politicians

in Cyberprotest
A conceptual framework for considering mapping projects as they change over time
Cate Turk

9 Maps as foams and the rheology of digital spatial media: a conceptual framework for considering mapping projects as they change over time Cate Turk Introduction The world of mapping has rapidly moved from provisioning users with static twodimensional hard copy displays to maps that are on-line, immediate and dynamic. (Cartwright, 2013: 56) With a curious twist, we have come to think of a map like a ‘folding’ map that we carry around on our travels – a tactile three-dimensional thing with movement encapsulated in its title – as static as Abend also argues in

in Time for mapping
Art and the temporalities of geomedia
Gavin MacDonald

6 Traces, tiles and fleeting moments: art and the temporalities of geomedia Gavin MacDonald Introduction: geomediation in the inhabitable map In this chapter, I discuss ways in which artists have exploited and exposed the temporalities of ‘geomedia’. I am following writers working at the intersection of media studies and geography in using this term to refer to a contemporary complex of technologies, content and practices that involve mapping, remote survey visualisations and the binding of digital information to location via GPS (Thielmann, 2010; Lapenta, 2011

in Time for mapping
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Marcos P. Dias

, the (lack of) a silver BMW and two multi-storey car parks (the correct one and the impostor car park), among many others. The complex assemblage of actants mediating his participation reveals the potential of the city as a performative stage. All these actants were assembled across interconnected machines: performance, human, media, urban and several others. Paul’s account demonstrates the potential for reflection and serendipity to emerge from the perceived failure of functional machines. Some of the human and technical failures I observed in A Machine To See

in The machinic city
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Qaisra Shahraz

Home Immigrant – Qaisra Shahraz I read and hear about immigrants. I meet them in my everyday life. I have taught them for nearly fifteen years. I am dismayed that there is constant negative news in the media about immigration and refugees. I am disappointed that some politicians appear to have no qualms about using immigration as a topic to whip up racism to win them votes. I hate it when migrants are scapegoated for economic problems and when they become easy targets for vilification and hate. Remember the targeting of the Eastern European and Polish

in Manchester
Open Access (free)
Heterogeneous temporalities, algorithmic frames and subjective time in geomedia
Pablo Abend

­information, ordering time as linear and continuously proceeding (Rosenberg and Grafton, 2010). This has clearly changed with the contemporary hybrid media forms of the digital age, which offer new and multiple ways of time integration. Therefore, this chapter argues that one of the main distinctions between analogue maps and digital geomedia1 (Döring and Thielmann, 2009; Felgenhauer and Quade, 2012) can be found in the way visualisations organise the temporal dimension. In order to show this, I do not reject the idea of representation and inscription, but rather look at

in Time for mapping
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Marcos P. Dias

issues using GPS as a positioning system in Can You See Me Now? ( 2001 ), they decided to ask street participants in Uncle Roy All Around You ( 2003 ), to self-report their location through the handheld computers given to them. As I described in Chapter 1 , some of the participants sought to take advantage of this technological constraint by reporting their location ahead of their arrival, enabling them to ‘get information in advance’ from the online players (Benford et al., 2004 ). Nine years later in 2011 – at a time when locative media-enabled mobile phones

in The machinic city
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Natalie Bradbury

workforce, alongside a dedicated tramline and a new campus for the University of Salford. Sleek but soulless, the architecture is dominated by high-rises clad in corporate black and grey; the complex was awarded the Carbuncle Cup in 2011. Long before Salford’s association with media production, Manchester had its own reputation as ‘the other Fleet Street’, or the ‘Fleet Street of the North’. For over a century, it was a centre for the production and distribution of national, regional and local newspapers. Most famously, the Manchester Guardian was founded in the city in

in Manchester
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Marcos P. Dias

The machine-city What is the social and spatial experience of urban living in the twenty-first century? It inevitably – and increasingly – involves interactions with machines. Many of these consist of media machines that process vast amounts of data from both the surrounding environment and remote databases. Take a walk through your city. Leaving your home behind, you are likely to be carrying a very powerful information and communication machine in your pocket (your mobile phone). As you cross the street, an automated software system located in a citywide

in The machinic city
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Environmental activism online
Author: Jenny Pickerill

The politics of cyberspace is of importance both for the future use of computer-mediated communication (CMC) and within traditional political arenas, commerce and society itself. Within Britain there are many different political groups that have a presence online and utilise CMC, including for example members of the far right, human rights advocates, religious groups and environmental activists. This book examines the relationship between the strategies of environmental activist movements in Britain and their use of CMC. It explores how environmental activists negotiate the tensions and embrace the opportunities of CMC, and analyses the consequences of their actions for the forms and processes of environmental politics. It serves as a disjuncture from some broader critiques of the implications of CMC for society as a whole, concentrating on unpacking what CMC means for activists engaged in social change. Within this broad aim there are three specific objectives. It first evaluates how CMC provides opportunities for political expression and mobilization. Second, the book examines whether CMC use has different implications for established environmental lobbying organisations than it does for the non-hierarchical fluid networks of direct action groups. Third, it elucidates the influence of CMC on campaign strategies and consequently on business, government and regulatory responses to environmental activism.