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Ann Blair

In our time of increasing reliance on digital media the history of the book has a special role to play in studying the codex form and the persistence of old media alongside the growth of new ones. As a contribution to recent work on the continued use of manuscript in the handpress era, I focus on some examples of manuscripts copied from printed books in the Rylands Library and discuss the motivations for making them. Some of these manuscripts were luxury items signalling wealth and prestige, others were made for practical reasons – to own a copy of a book that was hard to buy, or a copy that could be customized in the process of copying. The act of copying itself was also considered to have devotional and/or pedagogical value.

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
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David Geiringer

within marriage, notably birth control, but other aspects of the Church’s approach to sexuality have been making the headlines in recent years. The revelations of clerical child abuse shook the world. 7 The Oscar-winning film Spotlight (2016) offered a chilling insight into the extent of the crimes that were committed, while also illustrating the central role of the media in uncovering and then

in The Pope and the pill
Carmen Mangion

further relevant complication is reflected in the assumption that the emergence of modernity was associated with the public sphere and concomitantly with masculinity. Some scholars have even suggested that modernity was antithetical to femininity. 15 But the challenges of modernity were definitely encountered by women, as this chapter will demonstrate, and manifested themselves in patterns of utilisation of material goods and media, in further education and professionalisation and in familial relationships. The language of modernity was emphasised in post-war Britain

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age
David Geiringer

expositors of a ‘sexual revolution’ and paved the way for a potential change in its understanding of married love. The British media interpreted the prohibitions of Humanae Vitae as being a consequence of the Church’s long-held disregard for, perhaps even opposition to, the healthy expression of female sexual pleasure. The Economist captured the prevailing opinion of the Church when it described

in The Pope and the pill
Abstract only
Carmen Mangion

decline in the ‘Global North’ (and increase in the ‘Global South’), they continue to attract media attention, though almost always as ‘other’. Since the 1950s, a profusion of books has been published in Britain and Ireland and elsewhere recounting personal experiences by nuns and about nuns. The genre of ‘nuns talking’ presents a disparate range of experiences. In Britain, Karen Armstrong’s gripping and widely cited 1960s memoir explores a complex young woman’s experience of a stifling convent regime and her eventual exodus. 3 Sister Giles’ story of parting is

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age
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Carmen Mangion

been a visible workforce in the first half of the twentieth century and they in turn were conscious of the various post-war secular movements. They encountered them in their students, families and in the media. They were influenced by these movements as well as by Council documents; the changing dimensions of religious life reflected the integration of new Church teachings with broader societal shifts. Transnationalism The religious institutes discussed here, both active and enclosed, were part of religious families which operated within transnational networks

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age
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Carmen Mangion

with ‘worldliness’. 56 The Catholic Herald considered the book significant enough to review it twice, after its initial publication and then a year later, when the revised edition was published. The favourable reviews emphasised also that female religious life needed updating, with the replacement of rote and ‘arid’ religious exercises and more access to news media so that religious were aware of world events. Religious congregations were encouraged to shift their ministries to ‘discovering and stimulating lay apostles’. Catholic Herald readers were told that

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age
David Geiringer

cultural agencies. 36 The operation of the mass media was not lost on the interviewees – Doreen pointed to the ‘modern obsession with sex in films and the media’ making it (sex) an ‘inescapable part of everyone’. 37 Ken Plummer maintains that Foucault’s account ‘neglects the rise of mass media in all its diverse forms [which Plummer argues ‘took off’ in the 1960s] and it provides little space for the

in The Pope and the pill
David Geiringer

/knowledge spirals – which is too opaque’. For Plummer, Foucault provides little space for the generation of particular kinds of stories at particular moments; his strangely undifferentiated model chiefly neglects the rise of mass media in late modernity. 32 Accordingly, the methodology of this study is informed by a process of ‘storying’ rather than ‘confessing’. The stories we tell do not simply give meaning to our interactions with

in The Pope and the pill
Hayyim Rothman

‘the spirit of God’ to hover over the surface of the ‘raging waters’ of Babylon, Media, Greece, and Rome (Alexandrov 1900a , 15)’ so as to ‘overturn the order of things and impart unto the peoples ‘pure of speech, so that they all invoke the Lord by name and serve him with one accord (Zephaniah 3:9; Alexandrov 1896 , 43).’ Thus, we find that Alexandrov's vision as to the reunion of the empirical-I and the Absolute-I via mystical intuition has three implications. One, a thoroughly cosmopolitan conception of Jewish identity. Two, a messianic

in No masters but God