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An approach to remembering and documenting everyday experiences
Karin Widerberg

Introduction In an increasingly mediated society, the importance of discovery and questioning of the mundane becomes vital to ground actions, individually and collectively, in alternative ways. Memory Work is an approach developed to help explore the mundane by problematising the things we take for granted. Through recalling and documenting stories of memories and experiences, participants, researchers and research-subjects are invited to look for variety – in one's own stories as well as in relation to the stories of the others – regarding

in Mundane Methods
Dawn Lyon

the project) to record memories and imaginations of the past and future. From this they produced a visual and aural montage of a journey along the high street through time, 8 which is also an exploration of the past, present and future of life and work on Sheppey. In our follow-on project, Imagine Sheppey, we extended our work with young people using arts practice to further explore how they are ‘oriented’ (Ahmed 2006 ) towards the future. In a series of arts-based workshops led by Tea, we intervened in selected sites on the Island to alter the space as

in Revisiting Divisions of Labour
Author:

This book offers an up-to-date survey of historical writing on the German Revolution of 1918–19, focusing on debates during the Weimar, Nazi and Cold War periods, and on developments since German reunification in 1989–90. Its aim is twofold: to make a comprehensive case for seeing the revolution as a landmark event in twentieth-century German, European and world history, and to offer a multi-faceted explanation for its often peripheral place in standard accounts of the recent German past. A central argument is that the ‘cultural turn’ in historical studies from the late 1970s onwards, while shedding important new light on the gendered and spatial dimensions of the revolution, and the role of violence, has failed adequately to grasp its essential political and emancipatory character. Instead, the fragmented narratives that stem from the foregrounding of culture, identity and memory over material factors have merely reinforced the notion of a divided and failed revolution that – for different reasons – characterised pre-1945 and Cold War-era historiography. Public recognition of a handful of reductive ‘lessons’ from the revolution fails to compensate for the absence of real historical debate and sustained, contexualised understanding of how the past relates to the present. The book nonetheless sees some welcome signs of a return to the political in recent urban, transnational and global histories of the revolution, and ends with a plea for more work on the entanglements between the revolution and competing or overlapping ideas about popular sovereignty in the years immediately following the First World War.

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Memory and forgetting in contemporary print work
Dierdre Brollo

In attempting to understand and articulate the complexities of memory, we often turn to metaphorical language. Words such as ‘imprint’ and ‘impression’, terms reminiscent of the fundamental language of printmaking, create a sense of the past remaining visible in traces left behind, of experience literally leaving its mark upon us. The

in Perspectives on contemporary printmaking
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Anna Green
and
Kathleen Troup

memory and remembering, and look at key developments in the analysis and interpretation of oral histories and oral traditions. What is memory? Memory has been represented in Western thought through a wide range of metaphors, as the Dutch psychologist and historian Douwe Draaisma noted: ‘Memory was once a wax tablet, codex or magic slate, then again an abbey or theatre, sometimes a forest, or on other occasions a treasure chest, aviary or warehouse’. More recently new technologies have provided the metaphors, from photography and film to the computer. 1 Understanding

in The houses of history
Wider still and wider
Author:

English nationalism, Brexit and the Anglosphere is the first sustained research that examines the inter-relationships between English nationalism, Brexit and the Anglosphere. Much initial analysis of Brexit concentrated on the revolt of those ‘left behind’ by globalisation. English nationalism, Brexit and the Anglosphere analyses the elite project behind Brexit. This project was framed within the political traditions of an expansive English nationalism. Far from being parochial ‘Little Englanders’, elite Brexiteers sought to lessen the rupture of leaving the European Union by suggesting a return to trade and security alliances with ‘true friends’ and ‘traditional allies’ in the Anglosphere. Brexit was thus reassuringly presented as a giant leap into the known. Legitimising this far-reaching change in British and European politics required the re-articulation of a globally oriented Englishness. This politicised Englishness was underpinned by arguments about the United Kingdom’s imperial past and its global future advanced as a critique of its European present. When framing the UK’s EU membership as a European interregnum followed by a global restoration, Brexiteers both invoked and occluded England by asserting the wider categories of belonging that inform contemporary English nationalism.

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England and the defence of British sovereignty
Ben Wellings

popular memory. Despite the efforts of some historians and politicians, the memory of the Somme as senseless slaughter in the mud stuck. Traceable to some of the writings of the later war poets and, in particular, a cynicism towards the war from the 1960s associated with Oh What a Lovely War, this memory of the Great War was the one that most closely aligned with the founding myth of European integration. But in contrast to the ‘European’ idea that the two world wars represented a catastrophe followed by renaissance, English memory of the conflict of the

in English nationalism, Brexit and the Anglosphere
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Anna Green
and
Kathleen Troup

of ‘imagined community’, ‘collective memory’, ‘historical consciousness’ and ‘performativity’ help us understand popular engagement with the past. The late twentieth and early twenty-first century has been described as a period of unprecedented interest in remembering the past. In the European context the German cultural critic Andreas Huyssen argued that an ‘obsession with memory’ was clearly evident in the widespread expansion of museums, the building of new memorials and monuments, and the restoration of historic neighbourhoods, and in retro fashions, film

in The houses of history
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England’s wider categories of belonging
Ben Wellings

highlighting national differences over the value of that Union. Instead it sought to commemorate a version of what we might now call ‘global Britain’. As Englishness became politicised, the UK Government offered up a memory of Empire to paper over the emerging cracks in the Union state. The years leading up to the Brexit referendum were also years of debates about Britain’s imperial past. The conclusions made about this topic were fairly one-sided: in 2014 59 per cent of respondents to a YouGov poll said that the British Empire was something to be proud of

in English nationalism, Brexit and the Anglosphere
A critical reader in history and theory, second edition
Authors: and

Every piece of historical writing has a theoretical basis on which evidence is selected, filtered, and understood. This book explores the theoretical perspectives and debates that are generally acknowledged to have been the most influential within the university-led practice of history over the past century and a half. It advises readers to bear in mind the following four interlinked themes: context, temporal framework, causation or drivers of change, and subjectivities. The book outlines the principles of empiricism, the founding epistemology of the professional discipline, and explores the ways in which historians have challenged and modified this theory of knowledge over the past century and a half. It then focuses upon three important dimensions of historical materialism in the work of Marxist historians: the dialectical model at the basis of Marx's grand narrative of human history; the adaptations of Marxist theory in Latin America; and the enduring question of class consciousness. The use of psychoanalysis in history, the works of Annales historians and historical sociology is discussed next. The book also examines the influence of two specific approaches that were to be fertile ground for historians: everyday life and symbolic anthropology, and ethnohistory. The roles of narrative, gender history, radical feminism, poststructuralism and postcolonial history are also discussed. Finally, the book outlines the understandings about the nature of memory and remembering, and looks at key developments in the analysis and interpretation of oral histories and oral traditions.