Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 474 items for :

  • Manchester Religious Studies x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Reconstructing justice in The Wonderfull Discoverie of Witches
Marion Gibson

On 16 November 1612 Thomas Potts, a court clerk at that summer’s Lancashire witch trials, sat in his lodgings in London’s Chancery Lane putting the finishing, and slightly desperate, touches to the enormous work The Wonderfull Discoverie of Witches , which he had been put in charge of compiling and editing. Potts said that he had ‘taken paines’ over the account of the Lancashire witches, reconstructing from memory their activities and their trials, at the behest of their judges and ‘for the benefit of my Countrie’ (a3). He was to say

in The Lancashire witches
Hidden narratives of Jewish settlement and movement in the inter-war years
Tony Kushner

. Such visibility was generally because of the concentration of Jews in certain locations, often linked to their place in the local economy. Until the early twentieth century, however, the Jews of Southampton were neither numerous enough nor sufficiently focused in particular occupations and residential areas to be a specific visual feature of the town’s topography. Post-expulsion, for example, the memory of medieval Anglo-Jewry in Southampton was limited to a particular house, rather than a major street as was the case in Winchester. 3 Similarly, after the

in Anglo-Jewry since 1066
Sex, Catholicism and women in post-war England
Author:

On 25 July 1968, Pope Paul VI shook the world. His encyclical letter Humanae Vitae rejected widespread calls to permit use of the contraceptive pill and deemed artificial contraception ‘intrinsically evil’. The Catholic Church is now commonly identified as the antagonist in a story of sixties sexual revolution – a stubborn stone resisting the stream of sex-positive modernity. There has been little consideration of how Catholic women themselves experienced this period of cultural upheaval. This book is about the sexual and religious lives of Catholic women in post-war England. It uses original oral history material to uncover the way Catholic women negotiated spiritual and sexual demands at a moment when the two increasingly seemed at odds with one another. The book also examines the public pronouncements and secretive internal documents of the central Catholic Church, offering a ground-breaking new explanation of the Pope’s decision to prohibit the pill. The materials gathered here provide a fresh perspective on the idea that ‘sex killed God’, reframing dominant approaches to the histories of sex, religion and modernity. The memories of Catholic women help us understand why religious belief does not structure the lives of most English men and women today in the way it did at the close of the Second World War, why sex holds a place of such significance in our modern culture, and crucially, how these two developments related to one another. The book will be essential reading for not only scholars of sexuality, religion, gender and oral history, but anyone interested in post-war social change.

Abstract only
,

Regimental chapel (formerly the chapel of St John the Baptist and then the Derby chapel). It was paid for by officers of the Manchester Regiment and dedicated on 5 July 1966 in commemoration of Manchester’s part in two World Wars and in memory of Sir Hubert Worthington, whose eighty-sixth birthday it would have been. The design was by Hazel Margaret Traherne (1919–2006), a textile and stained glass artist who over a long creative life concentrated increasingly on the use of colour as her primary focus. She worked with many

in Manchester Cathedral
Abstract only
,

his mother in 1609 – of individuals who had given monies and land to the church, the interest of which was usually distributed annually to the poor. 31 When and why these ‘title deeds of the poor’ were lost is unknown. Stone tablet erected by the trustees of the Green-Gown School in memory of Mrs Ann Hinde Of the small number of memorials to survive from the eighteenth century, two deserve notice. The first is

in Manchester Cathedral
,

memorial service for Edith Cavell (who had briefly lived in Manchester during 1906–07) in October 1915, at which the congregation was ‘for the most part a great assemblage of women, among whom were many nurses, rendered conspicuous by their uniforms of blue and grey, with patches of red’. Once again, Welldon urged his congregation to ‘think no thought of vengeance’. 22 A plaque in memory of Cavell was placed on the north wall in 1916. The scale of losses in the First World War had theological implications, which

in Manchester Cathedral
Abstract only
,

some skill, and the process was not always without incident. 210 Special services cropped up from time to time, both regular and unusual, such as the Ordination, Assize, and Founders’ Day Services. After the Munich air disaster in 1958, which killed many of the Manchester United footballers, two services were needed. The second was broadcast live on radio, and the commentator was Kenneth Wolstenholme. He was heard to say that the red surplices and white collars and ruffs of the choir were being worn in memory

in Manchester Cathedral
Elliot Vernon

presbyterians to the revolutionary regime. Love and his brethren sought to contrast the republic as an illegitimate, military-backed government resting on force with their fidelity to the cause of the Covenant and the ancient constitution. Love’s resistance against the Commonwealth long remained in the presbyterian memory. In 1655 the ailing Nehemiah Wallington would still make causal connections between Love’s execution and disasters befalling the city, and Love’s memory would continue with the publication of his posthumous sermons

in London presbyterians and the British revolutions, 1638–64
Amy G. Tan

rhetorical abilities could eliminate the need for meditation and related disciplines: ‘the best wit readiest to conceive, the firmest memory to retain; nor the volublest tongue to utter (excellent gifts but much abused to idleness and vain glory) may not exempt a man from studying, reading, writing sometime, meditation and continual prayer’. 15 Bernard saw a particularly

in The pastor in print
Amy G. Tan

(and funds to purchase them, and to provide for other needs) were required for one to understand the Bible and continue in one’s work. Of course, this was not merely intellectual: one’s studies complemented other spiritual disciplines: ‘the best wit readiest to conceive, the firmest memory to retain; nor the volublest tongue to utter (excellent gifts but much

in The pastor in print