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Edwin Bacon, Bettina Renz, and Julian Cooper

Bacon 06 3/2/06 10:30 AM Page 126 6 Migration This chapter assesses migration policies carried out in Russia in recent years within the framework of the securitisation approach used throughout this book. We argue that according to this framework some areas of migration policy have been successfully securitised. This conclusion is reached through the study of three factors: first, official securitising discourse on migration; second, changes made to the institutional framework regulating migration; and third, a number of important developments in the sphere

in Securitising Russia
Refugee women in Britain and France
Gill Allwood and Khursheed Wadia

Allwood 02 24/2/10 2 10:27 Page 49 Migration contexts, demographic and social characteristics: refugee women in Britain and France This chapter introduces the reader to the landscape of international migration within which female refugee migrants are positioned. Its aim is twofold. First, it gives an overview of inward migration flows into Britain and France while bearing in mind both the general European context and processes of feminisation which have occurred over the last 50 years. Second, it presents, as fully as available data allows, the demographic

in Refugee women in Britain and France
David Rieff

. If humanitarian certainties have been upended, it is not in Sri Lanka, or even Syria or Afghanistan, but in the NGO response to the migration crisis in Greece and in the Mediterranean. For here, whether they like it or not, when they rescue people at sea who are trying to get to Europe, relief NGOs are involved not just in caritative work, whose deontology is relatively straightforward ethically; here, they are important actors in a profound political struggle, whose outcome, along with the response or non-response to climate change, is likely to

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs

The Journal of Humanitarian Affairs is an exciting, new open access journal hosted jointly by The Humanitarian Affairs Team at Save the Children UK, and Centre de Réflexion sur l’Action et les Savoirs Humanitaires MSF (Paris) and the Humanitarian and Conflict Response Institute at the University of Manchester. It will contribute to current thinking around humanitarian governance, policy and practice with academic rigour and political courage. The journal will challenge contributors and readers to think critically about humanitarian issues that are often approached from reductionist assumptions about what experience and evidence mean. It will cover contemporary, historical, methodological and applied subject matters and will bring together studies, debates and literature reviews. The journal will engage with these through diverse online content, including peer reviewed articles, expert interviews, policy analyses, literature reviews and ‘spotlight’ features.

Our rationale can be summed up as follows: the sector is growing and is facing severe ethical and practical challenges. The Journal of Humanitarian Affairs will provide a space for serious and inter-disciplinary academic and practitioner exchanges on pressing issues of international interest.

The journal aims to be a home and platform for leading thinkers on humanitarian affairs, a place where ideas are floated, controversies are aired and new research is published and scrutinised. Areas in which submissions will be considered include humanitarian financing, migrations and responses, the history of humanitarian aid, failed humanitarian interventions, media representations of humanitarianism, the changing landscape of humanitarianism, the response of states to foreign interventions and critical debates on concepts such as resilience or security.

Middle-Aged Syrian Women’s Contributions to Family Livelihoods during Protracted Displacement in Jordan
Dina Sidhva, Ann-Christin Zuntz, Ruba al Akash, Ayat Nashwan, and Areej Al-Majali

governance in Jordan. Recent scholarship on gender and forced migration emphasises ‘women’s multiple positions within conflict and displacement situations, and […] female agency rather than depicting women as non-agentic victims’ ( Fiddian-Qasmiyeh, 2014 : 395; cf. Hajdukowski-Ahmed et al. , 2008 ; Freedman et al. , 2017 ). Still, women seem to be visible in the Syria humanitarian response in binary ways, either as victims (of gender

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
German Responses to the June 2019 Mission of the Sea-Watch 3
Klaus Neumann

-named Triton, which, however, did not result in a decrease of drownings in the Mediterranean. Privately funded NGOs have carried out SAR missions in the Mediterranean since August 2014, when Migration Offshore Aid Station (MOAS), which was founded and largely funded by Maltese-based entrepreneurs Christopher and Regina Catrambone, commenced SAR operations with its rescue vessel M/Y Phoenix . MOAS was soon joined by established humanitarian organisations such as Save the Children and NGOs specifically set up to carry out SAR missions. Their approaches varied, with MOAS and

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
An Interview with Caroline Abu Sa’Da, General Director of SOS MEDITERRANEE Suisse
Juliano Fiori

people access to information – facts – on the situation in the Mediterranean, so that they at least are able to form their own judgement on it. They can then decide whether they have a responsibility. Definitely the need is there. After eleven years with MSF, it was really this kind of political and social engagement that interested me. SOS is a ‘hydroponic NGO’, if I may put it like that – nourished from below. Working with the organisation in Switzerland is particularly interesting, given that the country is not very open-minded on migration. It

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Sean Healy and Victoria Russell

investigation into the alleged involvement of individuals in human trafficking and abetting illegal migration. Two other prosecutors also launched inquiries of their own, in Palermo and Cagliari. Several MSF staff were informed they were under investigation, although none have been charged, as were staff of Save the Children. Similar accusations were made by senior government ministers in Belgium ( Baczynska, 2017 ), in Austria ( Die Presse , 2017 ) and

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Editors’ Introduction
Tanja R. Müller and Gemma Sou

, www.refugee-economies.org/assets/downloads/Principles_for_Ethical_Humanitarian_Innovation_-_final_paper.pdf (accessed 25 November 2019) . White , B. T. ( 2019 ), ‘ Refuge and History. A Critical Reading of a Polemic’ , Migration and Society: Advances in Research , 2 , 107 – 18 , doi: 10.3167/arms.2019.020111 .

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Lewis Hine’s Photographs of Refugees for the American Red Cross, 1918–20
Sonya de Laat

) and with aid agencies centrally featured providing aid to forcibly displaced individuals. Taking a historical look at representations of refugees and a critical look at Hine’s World War I photography made for the American Red Cross thickens what has otherwise remained a very thin area of scholarship on this collection of the celebrated photographer’s work. Likewise, these photographs take on a new significance in the current era of unparalleled global migration, providing an important lens for gaining perspective on the present. Over the past century, the figure

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs