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Open Access (free)
Humanitarianism in a Post-Liberal World Order
Stephen Hopgood

The modern global humanitarian system takes the form it does because it is underpinned by liberal world order. Now the viability of global liberal institutions is increasingly in doubt, a backlash against humanitarianism (and human rights) has gained momentum. I will argue that without liberal world order, global humanitarianism as we currently understand it is impossible, confronting humanitarians with an existential choice: how might they function in a world which doesn’t have liberal institutions at its core? The version of global humanitarianism with which we are familiar might not survive this transition, but maybe other forms of humanitarian action will emerge. What comes next might not meet the hopes of today’s humanitarians, however. The humanitarian alliance with liberalism is no accident, and if the world is less liberal, its version of humanitarian action is likely to be less liberal too. Nevertheless, humanitarianism will fare better than its humanist twin, human rights, in this new world.

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Editor’s Introduction
Juliano Fiori

, the collapse of the Soviet Union represented a final victory for Western liberal democracy – an unexpected Hegelian denouement in the knotweed of History. Their euphoria – albeit short-lived – provided the entrance music for a new ethical order, constructed by the US, with a basis in liberal humanitarian norms. Without any direct and immediate threat to its hegemony, the US merged its geostrategy with a humanitarian ethics. In 1991, after the Gulf War, the US invaded Iraq in the name of humanitarian concern. The following year, to the

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Mel Bunce

’, in Bunce , M. , Franks , S. and Paterson , C. (eds), Africa’s Media Image in the 21st Century: From the ‘Heart of Darkness’ to ‘Africa Rising’ ( London : Routledge ), pp. 129 – 31 . Barthes , R. ( 1977 ), Image/Music/Text ( New York : Hill and Wang ). Bunce , M. , Scott , M. and Wright , K. ( forthcoming ), ‘ Humanitarian Journalism ’, Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Journalism Studies ( Oxford : Oxford University Press

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Visual Advocacy in the Early Decades of Humanitarian Cinema
Valérie Gorin

capitalized on negative and positive emotions. Adding sound to the animated picture (piano music, verbal accounts of humanitarian workers during screenings), the whole cinematic set-up was intended to allow a more intimate contact with suffering and trauma and thus transformed the film-viewing into a sensory experience: The Manchester Guardian said … ‘most of the audience probably already knew a good deal about what is happening in the famine district, but the pictures [from the movie] shocked them’.… Terrible as this pictorial representation of the ravages of famine is

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
The Politics of Information and Analysis in Food Security Crises
Daniel Maxwell and Peter Hailey

, K4D Emerging Issues Report 33 ( Brighton, UK : Institute of Development Studies ). Hopgood , S. ( 2019 ), ‘ When the Music Stops: Humanitarianism in a Post-Liberal World Order ’, Journal of Humanitarian Affairs , 1 : 1 , 4 – 14

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Christopher T. Marsden

commercial confidentiality), the final FCC ‘bright line’, and where it also involves degrading non-zero-rated content, also the second line on throttling. T-Mobile offered 33 zero-rated music services in its Music Freedom Plan since 2014, 37 which avoided any negative regulatory scrutiny in part due to the facts: its offer is non-exclusive, relates to music rather than heavily congesting

in Network neutrality
Christopher T. Marsden

. However, a new CRTC case may lead to a definitive ruling: the Videotron ‘Unlimited Music’ case. 67 The net neutrality regulatory battle in Canada played out as a broadcasting ownership battle, in which programme unbundling had as an integral part the decision to regulate zero rating in 2015. It was to be expected that net neutrality violations favouring the company’s preferred content would also form

in Network neutrality
Determining the methodology
Olivier Corten and François Dubuisson

: Du droit international au cinéma . 4 The timeliness of the project is further illustrated by the fact that, in the 10th Anniversary Conference of the European Society of International Law, held in September 2014 in Vienna, an Agora was dedicated to ‘International Law and Film: The Power of Pictures’. 5 In 2015, the International Law Centre launched a more global online publishing project, covering various aspects of the relationship between pop culture and international law: in addition to cinema, analyses focus on music, literature, comics, theatre, video games

in Cinematic perspectives on international law
Olivier Corten

turn, their violation represents a real act of contrition: ‘I broke my own rule. I started to give a fuck’, says Lieutenant Waters in a low voice. Heartened by such a leap of faith, his men follow him, and successfully carry out their mission, at the price of fierce fighting with the Nigerian forces sent to track them down. In the final scene, the rescued Africans thank the brave American soldiers, while tearful music combining percussion and panpipes plays in the background. As for Waters, exhausted and wounded, he literally falls into the arms of benevolent Lena

in Cinematic perspectives on international law
Laura Cahillane

radicals often had a fascination with the past, but this could often be analysed rather easily into a hatred for the “long present” …’5 One element in common in all strands of Irish separatists was their nostalgia for the ancient Irish past. The Gaelic state represented a utopia which had existed before the British ever arrived. It was idealised as a place in which everyone lived in harmony, and land, power and wealth were shared among the whole community. The people were interested in history, philosophy, poetry, music and storytelling. The ideal of a return to the

in Drafting the Irish Free State Constitution