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Gerry Smyth

5 Popular music and the Celtic Tiger Gerry Smyth Sing when you’re winning On 14 June 2012, the Republic of Ireland soccer team was comprehensively beaten 4–0 at the UEFA Euro Football Championships by the eventual winners, Spain. During an on-­the-­pitch post-­match interview for the UK’s ITV network, the Irish midfielder Keith Andrews praised the quality of the opposition as well as the ‘brilliant’ support of the Irish fans, who continued en masse to sing ‘The Fields of Athenry’ throughout the final minutes of the match. Coverage then returned to the studio

in From prosperity to austerity
Open Access (free)
Humanitarianism in a Post-Liberal World Order
Stephen Hopgood

The modern global humanitarian system takes the form it does because it is underpinned by liberal world order. Now the viability of global liberal institutions is increasingly in doubt, a backlash against humanitarianism (and human rights) has gained momentum. I will argue that without liberal world order, global humanitarianism as we currently understand it is impossible, confronting humanitarians with an existential choice: how might they function in a world which doesn’t have liberal institutions at its core? The version of global humanitarianism with which we are familiar might not survive this transition, but maybe other forms of humanitarian action will emerge. What comes next might not meet the hopes of today’s humanitarians, however. The humanitarian alliance with liberalism is no accident, and if the world is less liberal, its version of humanitarian action is likely to be less liberal too. Nevertheless, humanitarianism will fare better than its humanist twin, human rights, in this new world.

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Editor’s Introduction
Juliano Fiori

, the collapse of the Soviet Union represented a final victory for Western liberal democracy – an unexpected Hegelian denouement in the knotweed of History. Their euphoria – albeit short-lived – provided the entrance music for a new ethical order, constructed by the US, with a basis in liberal humanitarian norms. Without any direct and immediate threat to its hegemony, the US merged its geostrategy with a humanitarian ethics. In 1991, after the Gulf War, the US invaded Iraq in the name of humanitarian concern. The following year, to the

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Mel Bunce

’, in Bunce , M. , Franks , S. and Paterson , C. (eds), Africa’s Media Image in the 21st Century: From the ‘Heart of Darkness’ to ‘Africa Rising’ ( London : Routledge ), pp. 129 – 31 . Barthes , R. ( 1977 ), Image/Music/Text ( New York : Hill and Wang ). Bunce , M. , Scott , M. and Wright , K. ( forthcoming ), ‘ Humanitarian Journalism ’, Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Journalism Studies ( Oxford : Oxford University Press

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Visual Advocacy in the Early Decades of Humanitarian Cinema
Valérie Gorin

capitalized on negative and positive emotions. Adding sound to the animated picture (piano music, verbal accounts of humanitarian workers during screenings), the whole cinematic set-up was intended to allow a more intimate contact with suffering and trauma and thus transformed the film-viewing into a sensory experience: The Manchester Guardian said … ‘most of the audience probably already knew a good deal about what is happening in the famine district, but the pictures [from the movie] shocked them’.… Terrible as this pictorial representation of the ravages of famine is

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
The Politics of Information and Analysis in Food Security Crises
Daniel Maxwell and Peter Hailey

, K4D Emerging Issues Report 33 ( Brighton, UK : Institute of Development Studies ). Hopgood , S. ( 2019 ), ‘ When the Music Stops: Humanitarianism in a Post-Liberal World Order ’, Journal of Humanitarian Affairs , 1 : 1 , 4 – 14

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
A society in transition

In the last generation, Northern Ireland has undergone a tortuous yet remarkable process of social and political change. This book explores what Northern Ireland was like during violent conflict, and whether the situation is any different 'after the troubles'. It examines the political developments and divisions essential to a critical understanding of the nature of Northern Irish society. The book focuses a number of elements of popular cultural practice that are often overlooked when social scientists address Northern Ireland. Sport plays an important though often dispiriting role that in Northern Irish society. It looks at some of the problems and ways forward for transitional justice and memory work in Northern Ireland. The book reviews the history of strategic spatial policy in post-partition Northern Ireland. It draws on feminist scholarship to expose how explanations of the ethnic conflict that ignore gender are always partial. The book illustrates how feminist and gender politics are part of the political culture of Northern Ireland and offers conceptual resources to academics engaged in investigating the conflict. It further provides a brief outline of critical race theory (CRT) and the critique of whiteness therein before using it as a basis from which to examine the research literature on racism in Northern Ireland. The course that popular music has taken in Northern Ireland during 1990s of the peace process, is also considered and the most crucial issues of the peace process, police reform, are examined.

Politics and popular culture

The relationship between politics and popular culture is often seen to take one of two forms. Either popular culture is seen to disengage or passify citizens; or it is portrayed as a source of political knowledge and expression. Such claims are rarely subjected to detailed scrutiny. From Entertainment to Citizenship is an attempt to make up this deficit by examining carefully how popular culture’s politics is understood and used. Focusing on the lives and experiences of 17-18 year olds in the UK, it explores the extent to which these young people use popular culture to think about and engage with politics. The book compares the political role of different forms of popular culture (video games, music and entertainment television), and it considers different dimensions of the relationship. It looks at the phenomenon of the ‘celebrity politician’, at popular culture as a source of knowledge about the ‘real world’ and at the group identities forged around the pleasures of music, TV and video games. We conclude that popular culture is an important source of knowledge about the world, that it helps forge identities and the interests associated with them, and it gives form to the evaluations of power and its exercise. Rarely, though, does this interplay of politics and popular culture happen in neat or straightforward ways.

Popular music
Sean Campbell and Gerry Smyth

M1426 - COULTER TEXT.qxp:GRAHAM Q7 17/7/08 08:02 Page 232 12 From shellshock rock to ceasefire sounds: popular music Sean Campbell and Gerry Smyth In recent years a number of authors have sought to establish popular music as an important element within the Irish critical imagination. They have done so because among the many achievements of international popular music studies has been an appreciation that this kind of cultural practice provides one of the key means for subjects to understand the world and themselves in relation to it. As Martin Stokes

in Northern Ireland after the troubles
Abstract only
‘Symbols of defiance’ from the print to the digital age
Matt Grimes and Tim Wall

15 Punk zines: ‘symbols of defiance’ from the print to the digital age Matt Grimes and Tim Wall In this chapter we examine the development of punk fanzines from the late 1970s to the present, exploring the role of these music fan-produced publications in giving meaning to the experience of a music community. This discussion of the punk fanzine’s longitudinal existence allows us to investigate the variety of ways that the fanzines and webzines make sense of punk as music, a set of political ideas and as a subcultural scene. In particular we want to trace the way

in Fight back