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Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
James Mountford
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
W. W. Roberts
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Verna L. Moore
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
L. J. Austin
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Suzanne Cole

Following an extended period of neglect, the early 1840s saw a dramatic revival of interest in English church music and its history, which coincided with the period of heightened religious sensitivity between the publication of Newman‘s Tract 90 in early 1841 and his conversion to Roman Catholicism in October 1845. This article examines the activities and writings of three men who made important contributions to the reformation of the music of the English church that took place at this time: Rev. Frederick Oakeley; Rev. John Jebb and the painter William Dyce. It pays particular attention to the relationship between their beliefs about and attitudes towards the English Reformation and their musical activities, and argues that such important works as Jebb‘s monumental Choral Service of the United Church of England and Ireland (1843) are best understood in the context of the religious and ecclesiological debates that were raging at that time.

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Joseph Hardwick

by slow degrees by Gray, the high church bishop, after 1848. St James’, Sydney’s modest Anglican church, had an organ and choir from the 1820s, but criticisms of the quality of singing and music appeared in newspapers throughout the 1820s and 1830s. 47 Colonial royal ceremonial and Anglican privilege from 1872 All this changed in the final three decades of the nineteenth century. The British story is well known. In 1872, William Gladstone, as prime minister, convinced Victoria to re-engage with public life and

in Prayer, providence and empire
Carmen Mangion

pages identify themes from an ordinary young woman’s life: music, dancing, children, male company and even a suggestion of a marriage proposal (see Figure 2.1 ). Her lively social life was a part of her life in the secular world. She was of the world: fashionable, sporty, sensible and kind. These traits were repeated again and again throughout the book. Figure 2.1 Young woman leaving her hostel and dancing. Illustrations from Bride of a King (London: Daughters of Our Lady of Good Counsel, c. 1958), pp. 16–17 The ‘call’ to a vocation was not portrayed

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age