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P ROVISION FOR MUSIC was made from the foundations of the Collegiate Church, and early documents list four clerks and six choristers among the College officers. This is a small number of singers, smaller than might have been expected for such an establishment, and it was to have far-reaching consequences, both musically and legally. Numbers shrank further when the Elizabethan charter of 1578 confirmed the singers as four men and four boys. By then the choir 1 was well established, judging from the

in Manchester Cathedral
A history of the Collegiate Church and Cathedral, 1421 to the present
Editor: Jeremy Gregory

Founded in 1421, the Collegiate Church of Manchester, which became a cathedral in 1847, is of outstanding historical and architectural importance. But until now it has not been the subject of a comprehensive study. Appearing on the 600th anniversary of the Cathedral’s inception by Henry V, this book explores the building’s past and its place at the heart of the world's first industrial city, touching on everything from architecture and music to misericords and stained glass. Written by a team of renowned experts and beautifully illustrated with more than 100 photographs, this history of the ‘Collegiate Church’ is at the same time a history of the English church in miniature.

Preserving and reinventing traditions of learning in the Middle Ages

This edited collection explores how knowledge was preserved and reinvented in the Middle Ages. Unlike previous publications, which are predominantly focused either on a specific historical period or on precise cultural and historical events, this volume, which includes essays spanning from the eighth to the fifteenth centuries, is intended to eschew traditional categorisations of periodisation and disciplines and to enable the establishment of connections and cross-sections between different departments of knowledge, including the history of science (computus, prognostication), the history of art, literature, theology (homilies, prayers, hagiography, contemplative texts), music, historiography and geography. As suggested by its title, the collection does not pretend to aim at inclusiveness or comprehensiveness but is intended to highlight suggestive strands of what is a very wide topic. The chapters in this volume are grouped into four sections: I, Anthologies of Knowledge; II Transmission of Christian Traditions; III, Past and Present; and IV, Knowledge and Materiality, which are intended to provide the reader with a further thematic framework for approaching aspects of knowledge. Aspects of knowledge is mainly aimed to an academic readership, including advanced undergraduate and postgraduate students, and specialists of medieval literature, history of science, history of knowledge, history, geography, theology, music, philosophy, intellectual history, history of the language and material culture.

Origins and early development

Viking kingdom of Northumbria, and ‘repair and man it’. Two possible locations have been put forward for this burh. One is in the area of Manchester’s medieval core, where the burh may have been defended by Hanging Ditch or have comprised a smaller enclosure on the site of Chetham’s School of Music. The other possibility is that the burh involved the repair of the Roman fort in Castlefield and in recent studies this has been judged the more likely. 6 By the end of his reign in 924 Edward the Elder is thought

in Manchester Cathedral

tradition, pursued in close association with Chetham’s School of Music, remained a priority. In addition to the regular choral establishment, committed to singing choral evensong most days of the week, and including around twenty boys and girls and nine lay clerks, throughout this period there was also a voluntary choir, drawn from enthusiastic local people, which helped to cover those occasions when the regular choir did not sing. Other ensembles at various times also performed regularly in the Cathedral, including a

in Manchester Cathedral
Michael Carter-Sinclair

exhibitions, in displays of calisthenics, as synchronised entertainments to the music of Johann Strauss. Other gymnastics demonstrations took place, emphasising their healthy German spirit. The celebration finished with a play performed by younger members of the group, The Taking of the Oath by the Young People . Towards the end of the play, its central protagonist, a young blacksmith, addressed the audience in suitably patriotic terms: My people, my life, My Austria! I will gladly give to you My entire life! A chorus of young males and females

in Vienna’s ‘respectable’ antisemites

first Bishop of a diocese of Manchester, itself created on 1 September 1847, in what was now Manchester Cathedral. 4 Nineteenth-century chapters in English cathedral histories generally recount the impact of Ecclesiastical Commission reforms, major restorations, developments in decoration, services, and music reflecting the impact of Tractarianism, and efforts to fashion more meaningful relationships with both see city and diocese. 5 These duly figure here. Yet in 1880 Dean Benjamin Cowie would complain that

in Manchester Cathedral
Abstract only
Michael Carter-Sinclair

trust. On 13 March, news programmes that were planned for broadcast from Vienna were suspended. Instead, they were replaced by a new list of programmes for that day, consisting of either music or proclamations from senior Nazis, including Goebbels. 8 On 15 March, radio started at 3.00 p.m., but the voice of Austria had been silenced, since all news programmes were relayed from stations in the Reich . 9 The same occurred on 16 March, with news programmes from Cologne, Berlin, Hamburg, Breslau and Stuttgart. The only programme to come from Vienna was a concert of

in Vienna’s ‘respectable’ antisemites

disruption to the Cathedral. Belgian refugees were accommodated at the Cathedral Country Home at Mellor in Derbyshire. 12 The Precentor, Dennis Jones, joined up, fighting in the Dardanelles campaign in 1915. 13 But gradually the war began to impinge more directly. Several former choristers were killed and were later commemorated in a window in the music room. There was some criticism of the chapter’s expenditure in wartime. In 1915, when it proposed to spend £500 on a bishop’s throne as a memorial to Bishop Moorhouse, a

in Manchester Cathedral
Writing the history of Manchester’s Collegiate Church and Cathedral

Manchester to behave more like medieval guilds. There were also specially conceived services for ‘Women’ and for ‘the Clergy’. The services included music drawn from the five centuries of the Collegiate Church’s life. Public lectures on ‘Religion’ in each of those centuries were delivered by a stellar line-up of speakers, with A. L. Smith, Master of Balliol College, Oxford, on the fifteenth century; Walter Frere, Superior of the Community of the Resurrection, Mirfield, on the sixteenth; T. F. Tout, Professor of

in Manchester Cathedral