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Peter J. Martin

. (Among many notable immigrants, Friedrich Engels was a regular attender at Hallé’s concerts; Whitfield, 1988: 103). Through his participation in the Parisian music world of the 1840s, Hallé was already thoroughly imbued with the ‘serious music’ ideology fostered, as we have seen, Chap 6 10/7/06 11:51 am Page 117 Musical life in the ‘first industrial city’ 117 by aristocrats in both Vienna and London, but by then widely accepted (Johnson, 1995: 270ff). Hallé’s subsequent career in Manchester was driven by this commitment. As a recent refugee from what he

in Music and the sociological gaze
Peter J. Martin

education (Marquis, 1999), with implications which will be considered further below. Moreover, despite its informal pattern of organisation, the jazz world is highly centralised; since the 1940s, New York City – ‘the world’s largest jazz community’ (Berliner, 1994: 5) – has been recognised as the ‘scene’ where players must establish themselves if they are to be acknowledged as top performers. Whereas in the classical music world performance standards are maintained through formal training and examination, the development of jazz musicians – though no less rigorous – is

in Music and the sociological gaze
Abstract only
Peter J. Martin

or another. Finnegan (1989) demonstrated the many ways in which participation in a musicworld’ – even peripherally, and irrespective of the music’s ‘quality’ – could nevertheless provide people with both social and aesthetic satisfactions. Hennion quite explicitly focused on the activities of ‘music lovers’ (2001), while the karaoke enthusiasts studied by Drew, and Bull’s personal-stereo users, were evidently people who had a deep attachment to ‘their’ music, whatever style or genre they preferred. (Indeed, one of the strengths of Bull’s study derives from the

in Music and the sociological gaze
Peter J. Martin

’s research is the idea that participation in musical worlds, of whatever style, gives individuals positions in networks of social relationships, thereby linking them to the wider society in various ways. Indeed, her use of the term ‘pathways’ nicely illustrates both an important aspect of the various music worlds which is common to all of them, and the ways in which such culturally established routes relate people ‘both to each other and, through the series of personal networks, institutional links and social ordering of space and time necessarily implicated in each of

in Music and the sociological gaze