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The Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire
Author: Katie Pickles

Through a study of the British Empire's largest women's patriotic organisation, formed in 1900 and still in existence, this book examines the relationship between female imperialism and national identity. It throws light on women's involvement in imperialism; on the history of ‘conservative’ women's organisations; on women's interventions in debates concerning citizenship and national identity; and on the history of women in white settler societies. After placing the Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire (IODE) in the context of recent scholarly work in Canadian, gender and imperial history, and post-colonial theory, the book follows the IODE's history through the twentieth century. Chapters focus upon the IODE's attempts to create a British Canada through its maternal feminist work in education, health, welfare and citizenship. In addition, the book reflects on the IODE's responses to threats to Anglo-Canadian hegemony posed by immigration, World Wars and Communism, and examines the complex relationship between imperial loyalty and settler nationalism. Tracing the organisation into the postcolonial era, where previous imperial ideas are outmoded, it considers the transformation from patriotism to charity, and the turn to colonisation at home in the Canadian North.

The Politics of History Teaching in England, 1870–1930
Author: Peter Yeandle

Citizenship, Nation, Empire investigates the extent to which popular imperialism influenced the teaching of history between 1870 and 1930. It is the first book-length study to trace the substantial impact of educational psychology on the teaching of history, probing its impact on textbooks, literacy primers and teacher-training manuals. Educationists identified ‘enlightened patriotism’ to be the core objective of historical education. This was neither tub-thumping jingoism, nor state-prescribed national-identity teaching. Rather, enlightened patriotism was a concept used in the development of a carefully crafted curriculum for all children which fused civic intentions alongside imperial ambitions.

The book will be of interest to those studying or researching aspects of English domestic imperial culture, especially those concerned with questions of childhood and schooling, citizenship, educational publishing and anglo-British relations. Given that vitriolic debates about the politics of history teaching have endured into the twenty-first century, Citizenship, Nation, Empire is a timely study of the formative influences that shaped the history curriculum in English schools.

Empire and the question of belonging
Author: Daniel Gorman

This is a book-length study of the ideological foundations of British imperialism in the early twentieth century. By focussing on the heretofore understudied concept of imperial citizenship, it illustrates how the political, cultural, and intellectual underpinnings of empire were constructed and challenged by forces in both Britain and the ‘Britains Overseas’, the settlement colonies of Canada, South Africa, New Zealand and Australia. Debates about imperial citizenship reveal how Britons conceived of the empire: was it an extension of the nation-state, a collection of separate and distinct communities, or a type of ‘world-state?’ These debates were also about the place of empire in British society, its importance to the national identity, and the degree to which imperial subjects were or were not seen as ‘fellow Britons’. This public discourse was at its most fervent from the Anglo-Boer War (1899–1902) to the early 1920s, when Britain emerged victorious, shocked and exhausted from the Great War. Drawing on the thinking of imperial activists, publicists, ideologues and travellers such as Lionel Curtis, John Buchan, Arnold White, Richard Jebb and Thomas Sedgwick, the book is a comparative history of how the idea of imperial citizenship took hold in early-twentieth-century Britain and how it helped foster the articulation of a broader British World. It also reveals how imperial citizenship as a form of imperial identity was challenged by voices in both Britain and the empire, and how it influenced later imperial developments.

Elite European migrants in the British Empire
Author: Panikos Panayi

While most of the Germans who suffered expulsion during the First World War lived within British shores, the Royal Navy brought Germans from throughout the world to face incarceration in the their network of camp. This book offers a new interpretation of global migration from the early nineteenth until the early twentieth century. It examines the elite German migrants who progressed to India, especially missionaries, scholars and scientists, businessmen and travellers. The book investigates the reasons for the migration of Germans to India. An examination of the realities of German existence in India follows. It then examines the complex identities of the Germans in India in the century before the First World War. The role of the role of racism, orientalism and Christianity is discussed. The stereotypes that emerged from travelogues include: an admiration of Indian landscapes; contempt for Hinduism; criticism of the plight of women; and repulsion at cityscapes. The book moves to focus upon the transformation which took place as a result of this conflict, mirroring the plight of Germans in other parts of the world. The marginalisation which took place in 1920 closely mirrored the plight of the German communities throughout the British Empire. The unique aspect of the experience in India consisted of the birth of a national identity. Finally, the book places the experience of the Germans in India into four contexts: the global history of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries; German history; history of the British Empire in India; and Indian history.

Abstract only
Dana Arnold

The need for a single public culture – the creation of an authentic identity – is fundamental to our understanding of nationalism and nationhood. How are these manufactured cultural identities expressed? This book considers those questions in relation to the ways in which the aesthetics of national identities promoted the idea of nation that encompassed the doctrine of

in Cultural identities and the aesthetics of Britishness
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Peter Yeandle

a result, national identity was represented in school books as developed from the combination of a successful maritime tradition, propensity towards settling new territory, Christianity and a predisposition towards the love of liberty. In short, the primary aim of historical education was to teach citizenship or – to adopt the contemporary terminology – enlightened patriotism. These civic values, if

in Citizenship, Nation, Empire
William J. Bulman

written about the close historical relationship between these two discursive frameworks, aside from making the formal observation that both were species of ‘othering’ that shaped national identity. 3 Here I would like to suggest that over the course of the late seventeenth century, a change in elite understandings of popery and puritanism contributed directly to the articulation of a British form of orientalism. This connection seems to have gone largely unnoticed as a result of both scholarly specialisation and a set of historiographical orthodoxies concerning the

in Making the British empire, 1660–1800
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Peter Yeandle

objective of instilling national pride: a national curriculum, it is argued, should serve the ends of state. The suggested solution, now as in the 1980s, is a return to a ‘golden age’ of history teaching: a golden age characterised by a content-led curriculum, devoid of educational theory, and intended primarily to promote national identity. 2 One prompt for this study, then, is the desire to enquire what

in Citizenship, Nation, Empire
Graeme Morton

this blood claim might mean, and the relationship of that claim to national identity, is not straightforward, for just as the professed ethnicity and declared place of birth were inconsistent in 1901, so the modern conceptualisation of ancestral descent lacks standardisation across ethnicities and jurisdictions. 4 Further clouding understanding of transnational identities are

in Scotland, empire and decolonisation in the twentieth century
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Diane Robinson-Dunn

This book has examined the formation of English national identities in relation to Islam during the late nineteenth century through the lens of four historical developments: British anti-slavery efforts in occupied Egypt; the activities of the BFASS in regard to that campaign; gender conflicts and debates in English society; and the creation of a place for Islam in England in the

in The harem, slavery and British imperial culture