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Derek Johnston

this folk culture often saw what they collected as the remnants of a larger, lost culture, and so as things that needed to be gathered and preserved by the educated middle classes as a way of protecting and reinvigorating the national culture. This counts just as well for the eighteenth-century antiquarians and collectors of folk tales at the birth of modern nationhood as it

in Folk horror on film
Abstract only
Jonathan Rayner

images of nationhood produced by the Australian cinema is linked indelibly to enduring colonial, cultural associations. The stereotypes of Australian-ness which emerged in early, successful or favoured cinematic representations have entered the consciousness of local and foreign audiences. Consequently they form as benchmark from which subsequent images can diverge or derive power from contrast or comparison. Even under circumstances of indigenous production, the framework of cinema often remains a First World institution, from

in Contemporary Australian cinema
National identity and the spirit of subaltern vengeance in Nakata Hideo’s Ringu and Gore Verbinski’s The Ring
Linnie Blake

shapes the desires and identifications of individuals and social groups, the ostensible homogeneity of America is neatly exposed as a fiction predicated on the exclusion of those déclassé subjects who are denied or demonised by a media in thrall to dominant ideologies of nationhood. Dispossessed of the nation’s fictive promises of equality, the medically abused and mother-murdered Samara becomes a

in Monstrous adaptations
Australian films in the 1990s
Jonathan Rayner

of conversion or tolerance. However, each side has affected the other, as is suggested by the vestiges of feathered costumes left in the desert, and the incorporation of indigenous details (such as the costumes resembling frilled lizards) in the final performance. The subdued response to their act reflects the road movie truism that experiences on the road are more important than the motivation or destination of the journey. The Western’s sense of nationhood and the musical’s utopian tone form the basis of Priscilla ’s

in Contemporary Australian cinema
Abstract only
Jonathan Rayner

of the ‘Emperor’ Concerto. Its melancholic mood, heard alongside the final scenes of the fruitless searches of the Rock, emphasises the overthrow of an anachronistic social construct. Yet the same historical period also provides the setting for decisive movement towards a definition of Australian nationhood, with the federation of the colonised states in 1901. The call to and retreat into a distinctive natural landscape, away from a foreign and imposed authority, to which the girls respond represents a call to national as

in Contemporary Australian cinema
Jonathan Rayner

in death (even in celebrations of nationhood such as Gallipoli and Breaker Morant ) evince continuities of masculinity and nationality within the output of the Australian film industry: The teenage passions that permeate the American cinema, and often end in a triumphant union of the young couple despite parental and peer pressure, in Australian films … end in the disintegration of the couple … Passion is often seen as obsessive and destructive, as in Monkey Grip (Ken Cameron

in Contemporary Australian cinema