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Gunther Teubner’s foundational paradox
Andreas Philippopoulos-Mihalopoulos

, however, still hold true? Have we not moved well into an era of immediate, gratifying de-paradoxification? Fake news, complex finance, the spectral threat of a nuclear war: what is the relevance of an arcane theory of paradoxes in an era where action (even if misplaced), and resistance to such action, are so prominent? Teubner's answer is resolutely affirmative. Paradoxes remain the core of legal, political, financial and other

in Critical theory and legal autopoiesis
David McGrogan

eyes of any international legal regime in that regime’s own perspective. And this means that, unrestricted by constitutional or institutional barriers, any international legal regime is capable of perceiving any event as coming under its own purview. To use Koskenniemi’s own example to illustrate, in 2006 the European Court of Justice (ECJ) gave its decision in the MOX Plant case, which had originated in a dispute between Ireland and the UK over the operation of the nuclear processing plant at Sellafield in Cumbria. 5 Ireland had brought claims against the UK to

in Critical theory and human rights
David Miller

do is fully self-regarding – that is, has no perceptible impact on anyone other than the agent herself. Defenders of AAI will protest that I have caricatured their principle by taking a case like the Mediterranean beach-bars. They are concerned with much weightier instances in which governments take decisions that impact outsiders – refugees, climate change, nuclear waste, and so forth. What this reveals, however, is that any plausible

in Democratic inclusion
Rousseau’s and nationalism
Mads Qvortrup

the Nuclear Age (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1990). See G.L. Windelberger, La République conféderative des petits étates: essai sur le systémede politique étrayére de Jean-Jacques Rousseau (Paris: Presses Universitaires de France, 1900), chapter 2. However, there is some discussion about that. Patrick Riley (The Cambridge Companion to Rousseau (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001a) is sceptical as regards Rousseau’s work. See ‘Rousseau as a Theorist of International and National Federalism’, Publius, vol. 3, Spring Issue, 3–17. See also Fetscher

in The political philosophy of Jean-Jacques Rousseau
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Extending the reach of Baylean (and Forstian) toleration
Chandran Kukathas

way to look at the matter would be to say that toleration is a doctrine of peace. What requires further explanation, however, is precisely what kind of peace this might be. Peace may come in many forms, yet not all are equally secure or equally desirable. The peace of the graveyard, as Kant intimated, can be nothing more than a satirical notion, 37 as would be the peace that followed a nuclear holocaust. Equally, the peace endured by a terrorised populace would scarcely be worth commending, even if it were a peace of sorts. The peace of toleration is not the

in Toleration, power and the right to justification
Mads Qvortrup

progress, as if something is not quite as it was meant to be. We are no longer frightened by serpents, the eternal pyres of Hell, we no longer burn witches – and thank God for that! Yet, the epoch that has been described as ‘three centuries united by progress’, has also had a downside. And in some ways, this down side has, perhaps, been as dark as the evils which science and knowledge were supposed to overcome. The modern epoch has brought us soap-operas, Prozac and the electrical toothbrush, but it has also brought us the nuclear bomb, CO2 pollution, child pornography

in The political philosophy of Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Abstract only
Mark Olssen

, and unstable tension. Systems comprise ‘polyrelational circuits’ of ‘whole/parts’, made up of ‘elements’, ‘interrelations’, ‘organization’, and ‘whole’ (Morin, 2008 : 102). ‘In this circuit, organization plays a nuclearizing role’, says Morin ( 2008 : 102). As such, the system is ‘a totality of polycentric dispersion’, where small perturbations can derail and effect the whole ( 2008 : 104). Society can be viewed in such a model as a complex dynamical system. In such a conception, the process of emergence is ‘at the very heart of the theory of the system’ ( 2008

in Constructing Foucault’s ethics
Naturalism, will to power, normativity
Mark Olssen

, and see and hear thoughtfully’ ( 1974 : §301) would play a more decisive role in ‘steering the ship’. 15 Normative objectivity has a yardstick that ranges from near universal agreement (that murder, or wanton violence, is wrong), to highly disputed, to actively fought over. The future looked perilous enough to Nietzsche, with certain tropes of Nazism already on the cultural horizon, yet he was unaware of climate change, viral pandemics, global population growth towards ten billion, or the possibility of nuclear annihilation. However, he was aware of continuance

in Constructing Foucault’s ethics
Mark Olssen

emergence of new global issues around climate change, overpopulation, nuclear power, terrorism, and viral pandemics, than that the state’s role is being altered. Contingent changes are altering the calculus of individual versus group interests in terms of which state actions and global agencies act. In this sense, climate change, or uncontrolled population growth, constitute potential ‘tragedies of the commons’, as Garrett Hardin claimed, indicating the interconnectedness between the collective and the individual. For Hardin, because of the rational pursuit of self

in Constructing Foucault’s ethics
Memory, leadership, and the fi rst phase of integration (1945– 58)
Peter J. Verovšek

soul and fate of the nation were constantly reflected in the mirror of the Army.’ 81 While this setback disappointed Monnet, Schuman, and Adenauer, it was only temporary. By 1958, Europe had experienced a relance with the ratification of the Treaties of Rome. This agreement created two new European communities: the European Atomic Energy Community (Euratom) to oversee the continent’s supply of nuclear material, as well as the EEC, which aimed to create a common market in beyond the sectors of coal and steel. This ‘relaunch’ represented a significant institutional

in Memory and the future of Europe