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Abandonment
Steven Earnshaw

418 7 Brian Moore, The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne (1955): abandonment But what if the godless were right …? We are quite a few pages into The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne before discovering Judith Hearne’s drinking habit,1 and it is then that we begin to realise how her drinking is entangled with a growing intimation that God is no longer part of her life. Alienated through ostensibly social causes such as her ‘odd duck’ physical appearance and family responsibility, the character’s dulling of reality through drink is also her response to the kind of

in The Existential drinker
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In the beginning was song
Mads Qvortrup

6 Epilogue: in the beginning was song And the light shineth in the darkness; and the darkness comprehended it not. (John 1.5) We have (rather deliberately) said very little about the subject of music, as this is not obviously a part of Rousseau’s social philosophy. Yet music was – though scholars have often forgotten this1 – Rousseau’s main passion, and this passion spilled over into his political writings in more ways than one. Rousseau, the musician and note-copier, was an accidental philosopher. Had he not seen the prize question from the Academy in Dijon on

in The political philosophy of Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Author: Steven Earnshaw

Drinking to excess has been a striking problem for industrial and post-industrial societies – who is responsible when a ‘free’ individual opts for a slow suicide? The causes of such drinking have often been blamed on heredity, moral weakness, ‘disease’ (addiction), hedonism, and Romantic illusion. Yet there is another reason which may be more fundamental and which has been overlooked or dismissed, and it is that the drinker may act with sincere philosophical intent. The Existential Drinker looks at the convergence of a new kind of excessive, habitual drinking, beginning in the nineteenth century, and a new way of thinking about the self which in the twentieth century comes to be labelled ‘Existential’. A substantial introduction covers questions of self, will, consciousness, authenticity, and ethics in relation to drinking, while introducing aspects of Existential thought pertinent to the discussion. The Existential-drinker canon is anchored in Jack London’s ‘alcoholic memoir’ John Barleycorn (1913), where London claims he can get at the truth of existence only through the insights afforded by excessive and repeated alcohol use. The book then covers drinker-texts such as Jean Rhys’s interwar novels, Malcolm Lowry’s Under the Volcano, Charles Jackson’s The Lost Weekend and John O’Brien’s Leaving Las Vegas, along with less well-known works such as Frederick Exley’s A Fan’s Notes, Venedikt Yerofeev’s Moscow–Petushki, and A. L. Kennedy’s Paradise. The book will appeal to anybody with an interest in drinking and literature, as well as those with more specialised concerns in drinking studies, Existentialism, twentieth-century literature, and medical humanities.

Abstract only
Once more, with feeling
Simon Mussell

of labour in ways that reaffirm the conditions of women’s oppression. In this regard, one can point to the ways in which reason is traditionally figured as masculine-​active, while emotion is figured as feminine-​passive. Indeed, the word ‘passive’ has in common with ‘passion’ the Latin root passio meaning ‘suffering’, which proves crucial to the respective values attached to thinking and feeling. As Sara Ahmed notes: To be passive is to be enacted upon, as a negation that is already felt as suffering. The fear of passivity is tied to the fear of emotionality, in

in Critical theory and feeling
Love
Steven Earnshaw

and an escape from reality. How, then, to read character and novel when the narrative constantly echoes that of Christ’s passion, each chapter referencing events in a corresponding station? It is not the intention of this chapter to itemise every possible connection between the Stations of the Cross and Paradise, but I would note that there is an insistent paralleling between the novel and the gospel accounts which opens itself up to an interpretation at this symbolic level.16 231 A. L. Kennedy, Paradise 231 Although at no stage does Hannah quite say she is a

in The Existential drinker
Mads Qvortrup

– but ultimately unsatisfactory – answer is that he was a genius – though not always a very attractive one. In Dictionaire de la Musique, one of his lesser known works, he described a genius almost poetically as: He who makes the silence speak, who restates thoughts through emotions, and emotions through subtle allusions, who wakes passions in the depth of the heart … [He who], even when depicting the horrors of death, instils into the heart a feeling of life, which never deserts him. (V: 915) In his more sublime moments, Rousseau did exactly this. Uniquely for a

in The political philosophy of Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Abstract only
Simon Mussell

ineffective and in-​affective does not mean jettisoning all argumentation and pandering to the whims of individual agents or imagined grievances. Rather, it means re-​establishing the connection –​a potentially revolutionary one to boot –​between thought and feeling. It will require imagination and passion to foster persuasive and binding narratives about how the existing social order is systematically failing the vast majority of people in the world, and how a future one could be arranged to the mutual benefit of all. When I say I am a Communist, it is not because I

in Critical theory and feeling
Abstract only
Sal Renshaw

text on/by Hélène Cixous gives concrete expression to her earlier statement in Promethea, that her ‘I’ is never the subject of autobiography. Rather, inasmuch as the signifier ‘I’ signifies at all for her, it signifies freedom: ‘When I say “I,” this I is never the subject of autobiography, my I is free. Is the subject of my madness, my alarms, my vertigo. I is the heroine of my fits of rage, my doubts, my passions. I let itself go. I let myself go. I surrenders, gets lost, does not comprehend itself’ (1991a: 19). Cixous, as writer and as subject of writing, mine and

in The subject of love
Sal Renshaw

woven through her ongoing questioning of subjectivity. While the expressive vehicle has undoubtedly changed, Cixous’ concerns have largely remained the same. As Penrod explains, ‘Cixous’ texts in the final analysis are all intimately concerned with a thematics of life-affirming, love’ (1996: 12), and it is in respect of this life affirmation, this generativity, that I see divinity as one of the most consistent themes in her work. ‘The questions of who loves, who gives, and who celebrates life are constantly posed, never answered; love, passion, and a deep sense of

in The subject of love
Abstract only
Steven Earnshaw

passion for. These elements of experience, meaning, and passion are at the heart of Existential thought. In the Existential worldview it is not for anybody else to point an accusing finger at the committed drinker, be they close relatives, friends, medics, psychologists, the World Health Organization, the state, or latter-​day puritans. The choice to commit to drinking is absolutely central to the Existential drinker’s way of being, and one measure of success is the extent to which the individual can fend off the voices of others in his or her ongoing struggle for

in The Existential drinker