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Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Carmen M. Mangion

University Press, 2000), pp. 204–21; Susan Morgan, ‘Faith, Sex and Purity: The Religio-Feminist Theory of Ellice Hopkins’, Women’s History Review, 9 (2000), 13–34. 9 Susan Morgan, A Passion for Purity: Ellice Hopkins and the Politics of Gender in the Late-Victorian Church (Bristol: University of Bristol, 1999), p. 8; Patricia Crawford, Women and Religion in England 1500–1720 (London: Routledge, 1993), p. 1. 10 Coburn and Smith argue that American women religious demonstrated their power and influence to shape Catholic culture and American life in their ability to act and

in Contested identities
Carmen M. Mangion

narratives. The difficulties of ‘particular friendships’ seemed to stem from the impact of these friendships on the community. Scholars of American and Irish women religious have found that some ‘particular friendships’ may have challenged the authority of the mother superior and disrupted the ‘spiritual peace’ of the community, leading to divisions within the 50 Mary Peckham Magray, The Transforming Power of the Nuns: Women, Religion, and Cultural Change in Ireland, 1750–1900 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1998), p. 51, 72; Janice Raymond, A Passion for Friends

in Contested identities
Abstract only
Stephen Penn

someone is identified as a prophet is like a passion, since now it comes and then it goes away, in a way that enables a master to inform his unlearned disciples, who always require further instruction, as is signified figuratively in Exodus 33[:22]: ‘When my glory shall pass’. 73 The same is figured of Elias in 3 Kings 19[:11]: ‘behold the Lord passeth’, and is also evident of Eliseus in 4 Kings 3, who calls a minstrel to him. 74 This saint’s meaning, therefore, is that whoever has the prophetic light, even while he does not actually perform an act of prophecy, is

in John Wyclif
Abstract only
Carmen M. Mangion

passion, in either the neoclassical Italianate structures favoured by Ultramontanists or the gothic 41 Klaus, 1987, p. 7. 42 Not all the Irish-born population were Roman Catholic, but a great majority would have been. 43 Bossy, 1975, p. 313. 44 Reynolds, 1973, p. 349. Becoming visible 31 displays of munificence designed by Augustus Welby Pugin; they were a triumphant expression of the new confidence of the Roman Catholic Church.45 The Passionists and Redemptorists, regular orders whose mission was to convert the English, imbued their converts with a continental

in Contested identities
Hayyim Rothman

flattered their passions, directing popular wrath against class-scapegoats (Steinberg 1927a , 28–29). Thus distracted from the real task of building up institutions of justice and self-governance (Steinberg 1927a , 32), the infantalized population became that much easier to rule. In brief, Steinberg objects to the Marxist thesis on the grounds that its materialism and its determinism preclude moral reasoning and lead the way both to unbridled violence and to the concentration of power in the hands of a revolutionary vanguard. His outrage and

in No masters but God
Abstract only
Cara Delay

her the vision faded, leaving me full of wonder and joy and completely comforted.78 O’Brien’s apparition of the Virgin occurred after she had been punished and sent off to bed early. For her, Mary was a benevolent, motherly force who comforted her in a time of stress. For novelist Edna O’Brien, decades later, the blurry lines between the real and unreal focused on the worship of the body of Christ. Writing of her convent education, Edna O’Brien mused: Life was fervid, enclosed and catastrophic. The spiritual food consisted of the crucified Christ. His passion

in Irish women and the creation of modern Catholicism, 1850–1950
Cara Delay

. For the adult Murphy, her mother, her mother’s sacrifices, and her mother’s devotional gifts formed the central narrative of her own First Communion memories. After her communion, Murphy became ‘obsessed’ with the rosary beads and prayer-book; her feelings towards the communion artefacts paralleled her feelings towards her mother.63 For children, the effects of the mother-as-martyr trope were complex. While many Irish Catholic children had deep love or even passion for their mothers, some were anxious that they would disappoint them, and a few resented mothers

in Irish women and the creation of modern Catholicism, 1850–1950
Abstract only
Changing ministries
Carmen Mangion

Seeing ourselves as citizens of the world helps us to relatavise [ sic ] our own situation, since it is part of a much bigger whole. 1 Sister M. Philip (née Elizabeth) Rendall’s worldview changed sometime in the late 1960s. She began transitioning from her local, teaching-centred ministry to a global ministry ignited by her passion for justice. Born in London in 1924, she attended St Angela’s Ursuline Convent School at Forest Gate. She entered the Ursulines, aged eighteen, a few years before the Second World War began. After her novitiate training, she

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age
Abstract only
Carmen M. Mangion

their eyes a holy vocation. 57 Susan Morgan, A Passion for Purity: Ellice Hopkins and the Politics of Gender in the Late-Victorian Church (Bristol: University of Bristol, 1999), p. 89. Sue Morgan posits that churchwomen’s agenda for social change was their expression of religious feminism and should not be denigrated for its adherence to orthodox values. 148 Figure 1 Society of the Holy Child Jesus novices gathering greenery in Mayfield. Reproduced by permission of the Society of the Holy Child Jesus. Figure 2 Sisters of Mercy, Liverpool novitiate. Reproduced by

in Contested identities