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C. E. Beneš

of Christ in the thirty-fifth year of the years following the Passion of Christ. We can explain and prove our reasoning in this way: it is agreed among the authentic chronicles that Emperor Nero was killed in the thirty-sixth year after the Passion of Christ, and, as the blessed Jerome says in his book On famous men , this Nero murdered the holy apostles Peter and Paul in the last year of his reign. 25 Saint

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
C. E. Beneš

Christ—as stated above—about thirty-five years of the Lord after the Passion of Christ. At that time the princes of the apostles, Peter and Paul, were still living in the flesh at Rome. And thus it must be reasonably likely that the blessed Peter, who was pope when he heard that the city of Genoa had converted to the faith of Christ, sent a bishop to that city. For if the apostles sent bishops to more remote converted cities, it is both likely

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
E.A. Jones

. The rule that invokes his name was composed in Latin, and also survives in English translation. 62 The series of affective meditations on Christ’s life and passion is standard fare. The way in which they follow the canonical hours recalls Aelred’s much earlier set of meditations, written for his anchorite sister. Translated from the Latin of chapter 20, edited by Livarius Oliger, ‘Regulae tres reclusorum et eremitarum angliae

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
C. E. Beneš

from a good one. He who always strives after his own benefit, who does not seek the common good of the people and does not attend to the commonwealth, must be said to be a tyrant and not a ruler. He will torment the people subject to him according to the diverse passions of the vices to which he is subject. For if he hungers with the jaws of greed, he will seize the goods of his subjects. 22 As Solomon says, a

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
E.A. Jones

their ‘institutes’, 24 or the miracles or passions of the saints, or some other improving reading; so that, your reading having yielded a degree of compunction, you will say your compline (once the bell is rung in the choir, as said before) with some spiritual fervour, and with a heart full of devotion lay your limbs to rest. But at all times of the year beware that the darkness of night

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
Abstract only
E.A. Jones

steeple-height through the stone vents the smoke to the over-topping hill. There is an easy ascent made to this place, which mounts up to avoid the dangerous streams, and a descent also on the other side. Over the altar is painted an archbishop saying mass before all the instruments of our Saviour’s passion, and above certain lines now dashed out, declaring (I think) some indulgence to such as frequented here with devotion, which

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
E.A. Jones

for Prime he shall say 12 Our Fathers, 12 Hail Marys and 1 Creed. And when he has said Prime he shall hear mass. And after mass he shall say, for each [canonical] hour, 10 Our Fathers, 10 Hail Marys and 1 Creed. After that, he shall go to his oratory and have a meditation of the passion of Christ, or of some other holy thing. For mid-day [ i.e. the hour of Nones ] he shall say 10 Our Fathers, 10 Hail Marys and 1 Creed, and

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
C. E. Beneš

it to those whom the images represent. It is true that there is no image of God in the Old Testament because God was then invisible, so an image of him would have been impossible to make. But while first invisible in his divine nature, God was later made visible in his human nature, and thus we can represent in images those things which Christ did in his human flesh—such as his birth, passion, resurrection, ascension, and the other miracles

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
E.A. Jones

, have utterly conquered all passions and (as far as is possible to a soul still on its journey through this life) extinguished totally all inordinate affections, and are now able to fight against all temptations alone, and possess and have acquired by grace such sweetness of divine love and contemplation that for them earthly things have no savour, but they delight in heavenly things alone. Such people have no need of human

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
Abstract only
C. E. Beneš

Florentii and Historia translationis reliquiarum eiusdem ), and a passion narrative of Saint Cassian ( Passio sancti Cassiani ) for the bishop of Imola, who had recently (1271) consecrated his new cathedral to that saint. In all of these treatises, Jacopo engages his audience by using local landscapes (of Genoa, Liguria, and beyond) to create a sense of immediacy for the reader; the associations that his narrative builds between landscape, object

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa