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Hanneke Canters and Grace M. Jantzen

Elemental Passions CHAPTER 4 Interpretive synopsis of Elemental Passions One: prologue The first chapter can be regarded as a Prologue. Irigaray begins with short, staccato sentences. White. Immense spaces. White, a rush of breath. Be swift, marry this breath. Remain in it. Make haste. Let it not abandon me. Let me not turn from it. Be swept up: my song. (EP 7) De grands espaces. Blancs. Un grand souffle, blanc. Rapide, épouser ce souffle. Y rester. Dans la hâte. Qu’il ne m’abandonne pas. Que je ne le laisse pas.Y être entraînée : mon chant. (Pe 7) The short

in Forever fluid
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A reading of Luce Irigaray’s Elemental Passions

The recognition of a female subject is relatively recent in Western philosophy, through Western intellectual history, it has been assumed to be normatively male. This book provides the first English commentary on Luce Irigaray's poetic text, Elemental Passions, setting it within its context within continental thought. It explores Irigaray's images and intentions, developing the gender drama that takes place within her book, and draws the reader into the conversation in the text between 'I-woman' and 'you-man'. In Irigaray's philosophy of sexual difference love is of ultimate significance for the development and mutual relationship of two subjects. The book explains how the lack of a subject position for women is related to the emergence of rigid binaries, and catches a hint of how subversive attention to fluidity is to the masculinist pattern. This emphasis on desire and sexual difference obviously intersects with the psychoanalytic theories of S. Freud and J. Lacan, theories which had enormous impact on French philosophers of the time. Irigaray has used vivid imagery from the very beginning of her writings. A few of her images, in particular that of the lips, have become famous in feminist writings. The development of mutually affirming sexual subjects, different but not oppositional, and thereby the destabilizing of traditional binary categories of oppositional logic, is simultaneously highly innovative and has far-reaching consequences. The book presents a critique of Irigaray's methods and contentions to critical scrutiny, revisiting the idea of fluidity in relation to logic.

Morny Joy

CHAPTER 2 Cartesian meditations Because the pleasures of the body are minor, it can be said in general that it is possible to make oneself happy without them. However, I do not think that they should be altogether despised, or even that one should free oneself altogether from the passions. It is enough to subject one’s passions to reason; and once they are thus tamed they are sometimes the more useful the more they tend to excess. (Descartes 1991: 265) And it can be said in particular of Wonder that it is useful in making us learn and retain in our memory

in Divine love
Context and style of Elemental Passions
Hanneke Canters and Grace M. Jantzen

Problems of rigidity CHAPTER 3 ‘Fragments from a woman’s voyage’: context and style of Elemental Passions Elemental Passions makes few concessions to the reader. Both in style and content it is elusive, open to various interpretations. Unlike most texts of traditional Western philosophy and psychoanalysis which argue a thesis or develop a point of view, Elemental Passions invites the reader inside, makes suggestions to enable the reader to set off on her own journey rather than follow predetermined steps laid out by somebody else. The original text of Elemental

in Forever fluid
Hanneke Canters and Grace M. Jantzen

CHAPTER 5 Interpretative synopsis of Elemental Passions Images for a female subject Introduction Elemental Passions has given us an insight into a new way of thinking, using images of fluidity which reconfigure sexual difference and thereby subvert the rigidity of the binary logic of traditional philosophy and psychoanalysis. In this chapter we would like to select some of the most important of these images which have emerged in the commentary on Elemental Passions and look at them in more detail. We suggest that these unaccustomed images of fluidity could

in Forever fluid
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Mary in each middle stanchion, and along the north side were representations of Christ’s arrest and crucifixion (the Passion window). Windows representing St John the Baptist and Christ were to be found in the chapel of that name (now the Regimental chapel). The destruction during the Civil War was not complete, and remnants of glass remained in place. The construction of galleries, commencing with Humphrey Booth of Salford in 1617 and concluding with the Strangeways gallery of 1660, no doubt obscured the windows and

in Manchester Cathedral
Laurence Lux-Sterritt

5 • Taming worldly emotions and appetites In his Poetics, Aristotle (383–322 BC) stated that passions were an intrinsically human trait and could not be ignored; he c­ onsidered that, although some passions could be harmful, others might be acceptable in a good and virtuous life. Yet such was not the general view in seventeenth-century Europe. Early modern authors were more receptive to the Stoicism of Cicero (106–43 BC) and Seneca (c. 1–45) and to their much harsher judgement of pathos as perturbation, giving emotions a much more negative and disruptive

in English Benedictine nuns in exile in the seventeenth century
Michael Carter-Sinclair

their German populations sought an association with the German Confederation, and appealed to the Confederation for armed assistance to bring this about. 59 For some in Vienna, this raised nationalist passions in support of ‘fellow Germans.’ From the inns of Vienna, calls went out for the German states to move against Denmark. By January 1864, activists were raising funds for volunteers to support any military efforts that might take place. 60 Politics and diplomacy, however, were the main drivers behind the decision by the Austrian and Prussian governments to

in Vienna’s ‘respectable’ antisemites
Elliot Vernon

self-defence against a ruler operating out of his own ‘illegal will and ways’. 29 In making these arguments the ministers relied on the medieval idea that the monarch’s office and person could be separated. When the king acted beyond the law, allegiance was owed to the king’s political capacity and not to the king’s physical person. 30 Samuel Clarke argued that the king’s behaviour demonstrated that he was acting as a man ‘whose passions may mislead him’. Consequently, he could be defensively resisted until

in London presbyterians and the British revolutions, 1638–64
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selected to attend that year, it must have been quite a sight for the crowds that inevitably assembled. Indeed, by the 1950s it was estimated that the procession was taking over four hours to pass at any point. 181 Each year before Easter the St Matthew Passion was performed, with orchestra and two of the Cathedral choirs. The statutory choir took the bulk of the music, reinforced by the ‘Special’ choir (probably the cantata choir, since sopranos are mentioned) for the chorales, in which the congregation

in Manchester Cathedral