Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 21 items for :

  • "performance history" x
  • Manchester Literature Studies x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Abstract only
Sounding The House of Fame in Troilus and Cressida
Helen Barr

breathing and wild cheering accompanied the fight.63 At the slaughter of Hector (Davies (1985)), Thersites let out a high-pitched scream, while, in 1963, a production by the Birmingham Repertory Reverberate Troy 213 Theatre sounded to the noise of wrenches and chains as Achilles led a gang of leather-jacketed motorbike thugs. In Canada in 1987, one of the Myrmidons was heard to utter ‘vroom vroom’ as they moved in for the kill.64 Performance history reveals that these pugilistic sound effects were heard alongside a cacophony of incidental noise: Patroclus hitting

in Transporting Chaucer
Abstract only
The Mystery of the Charity of Charles Péguy (1983)
Jeffrey Wainwright

characters and their intentions, are part of a grotesque and endlessly repetitive performance: History commands the stage wielding a toy gun, rehearsing another scene. It has raged so before, countless times; and will do, countless times more, in the guise of supreme clown, dire tragedian. (1) The words perform, they are performed, and their performance is but part of history’s theatre, put before us since Péguy’s time, in the continuous

in Acceptable words
Rachel Willie

(and displacing) topical events, the hesitant ending could be a response to hesitant times. While this possible performance history may offer an explanation regarding the ambiguous ending of The Siege of Rhodes, like the first part, the second part could also have been redesigned to accommodate the Restoration. As the earliest printed edition of the second part dates to 1663, we do not know if some modifications were made to the text between its entry in the Stationers’ Register and its publication. However, the title pages to the 1663 editions of both texts offer

in Staging the revolution
Abstract only
Of 1647, theatre closure and reinvention
Rachel Willie

, the performance history of Edward Howard’s The Change of Crownes (1667) emphasises that, far from being a royalist entity, the Restoration stage was shaped and informed by the previous twenty years. The prompt book of The Change of Crownes is, in many ways, an invaluable document. However, the empirical evidence that can be garnered from the text means that very little can be authoritatively asserted about the play’s performance and the anecdotes complicate rather than elucidate our understanding of the drama. The prompt book is mainly written in a neat italic hand

in Staging the revolution
Abstract only
Transporting Chaucer
Helen Barr

narrator refuses to anchor the free-floating tidings of Troy with the authority of a Proper Name. The figure of Antenor in Troilus is his opposite: a name without a voice. On stage, but mute, Antenor is a silent physical reminder of the fall of Troy that the audience will already have known even through it remains explicitly unspoken during the course of the play. And yet, directorial choices in the play’s performance history have yielded a scenario in which this speechless body becomes spokesperson for all the characters in Troy. Antenor and the narrator of The House of

in Transporting Chaucer
Shirley’s and Davenant’s protectorate entertainments
Rachel Willie

regarding the masque’s performance history. The title pages of earlier masques bear information about the date and circumstances of the performance. Often, there then follows a preamble regarding the splendour of the occasion, usually idealising the evening’s entertainments and overlooking the drunken, gluttonous and debauched proceedings to which they were sometimes reduced.13 The preamble and annotated text frequently describe in detail the staging of the masque, and the reader is directed to interpret the allegory of the performance as representing a positive image of

in Staging the revolution
Rachel Willie

Restoration might be the play’s first performance occurring before this event took place. The Rump’s performance history is ambiguous. Following van Lennep, Susan Wiseman states that the play was performed in 1659.13 Conversely, Hughes (after Harold Love) pinpoints the date of first performance to May/June1660.14 More recently, Michael Cordner has suggested that the play was written around March 1660 to form part of London’s anti-Rump festivities and is therefore too early to enter into discourse relating to the Restoration.15 If we consider the play’s relation to panegyric

in Staging the revolution
Laywomen in monastic spaces
Susannah Crowder

, religious, and cultural upheaval. By the fifteenth century, Catherine Gronnaix could still draw upon this body of narrative and practice in the form of commemorative performances that united monastic and lay identity. To develop these divergent examples, I join methods that explore how institutions and individuals negotiated history, identity, and place to the performance history approach. Concepts of community and its functions are a significant field within the study of the Middle Ages, and include definitions centred on texts, interpretation, viewing, and emotions.1

in Performing women
Abstract only
Susannah Crowder

, performative, and transformative. Gendered public performance offered roles of expansive range and depth to the women of Metz and positioned them as vital and integral contributors to the fabric of urban life. Methodology and historiography Performing women develops an approach that I term ‘performance history’: the use of performance methodologies to study and write cultural history.9 The vocabulary of performance now permeates the field of medieval studies, and scholars have adopted its methods widely.10 This book appropriates select concepts, however, in service of a

in Performing women
Abstract only
Biography, documentary culture, and public presence
Susannah Crowder

2 ‘I, Catherine’: biography, documentary culture, and public presence Introduction In the previous chapter, performance history provided an alternative understanding of the 1468 Saint Catherine jeu that incorporated social and cultural context; it demonstrated that the jeu took part in a movement that positioned women at the centre of devotions to the saint. To further develop this relationship between women’s lives and performances, I turn to Catherine Baudoche, who funded the jeu, and the interaction between her performance practice and financial activity more

in Performing women