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Bogdan Popa

support of psychoanalysis, and Soviet psychologists’ criticism of the individualist bases of psychoanalytic theory), which all seem to point to a rejection of Freudianism. 5 My premise in this chapter is that psychoanalytical concepts such as the unconscious not only were very influential in queer theory but were also shaped by the Cold War. One of the most

in De-centering queer theory
Jaya Sharma

looking critically at feminism from within, an important frame that Rose uses is that of psychoanalysis. She clarifies that it is not the individual psyche that she is referring to but the collective psyche. ‘We are “peopled” by others. Our psyche is a social space’, she writes (Rose, 2017 : 72). In this space of the psyche Rose looks at sexuality, in particular, since it ‘always contains an element beyond human manipulation, however free we think we are’. This is a valuable space because it is in the ‘sexual

in Intimacy and injury
The Manchester School, colonial and postcolonial transformations
Author: Richard Werbner

Anthropology after Gluckman places the intimate circle around Max Gluckman, his Manchester School, in the vanguard of modern social anthropology. The book discloses the School’s intense, argument-rich collaborations, developing beyond an original focus in south and central Africa. Where outsiders have seen dominating leadership by Gluckman, a common stock of problems, and much about conflict, Richard Werbner highlights how insiders were drawn to explore many new frontiers in fieldwork and in-depth, reflexive ethnography, because they themselves, in class and gender, ethnicity and national origins, were remarkably inclusive. Characteristically different anthropologists, their careers met the challenges of being a public intellectual, an international celebrity, an institutional good citizen, a social and political activist, an advocate of legal justice. Their living legacies are shown, for the first time, through interlinked social biography and intellectual history to reach broadly across politics, law, ritual, semiotics, development studies, comparative urbanism, social network analysis and mathematical sociology. Innovation – in research methods and techniques, in documenting people’s changing praxis and social relations, in comparative analysis and a destabilizing strategy of re-analysis within ethnography – became the School’s hallmark. Much of this exploration confronted troubling times in Africa, colonial and postcolonial, which put the anthropologists and their anthropological knowledge at risk. The resurgence of debate about decolonization makes the accounts of fierce, End of Empire argument and recent postcolonial anthropology all the more topical. The lessons, even in activism, for social scientists, teachers as well as graduate and undergraduate students are compelling for our own troubled times.

Given the significant similarities and differences between the welfare states of Northern Europe and their reactions to the perceived 'refugee crisis' of 2015, the book focuses primarily on the three main cases of Denmark, Sweden and Germany. Placed in a wider Northern European context – and illustrated by those chapters that also discuss refugee experiences in Norway and the UK – the Danish, Swedish and German cases are the largest case studies of this edited volume. Thus, the book contributes to debates on the governance of non-citizens and the meaning of displacement, mobility and seeking asylum by providing interdisciplinary analyses of a largely overlooked region of the world, with two specific aims. First, we scrutinize the construction of the 2015 crisis as a response to the large influx of refugees, paying particular attention to the disciplinary discourses and bureaucratic structures that are associated with it. Second, we investigate refugees’ encounters with these bureaucratic structures and consider how these encounters shape hopes for building a new life after displacement. This allows us to show that the mobility of specific segments of the world’s population continues to be seen as a threat and a risk that has to be governed and controlled. Focusing on the Northern European context, our volume interrogates emerging policies and discourses as well as the lived experiences of bureaucratization from the perspective of individuals who find themselves the very objects of bureaucracies.

Author: Ebun Joseph

With race as a central theme, this book presents racial stratification as the underlying system which accounts for the difference in outcomes of Whites and Blacks in the labour market. Critical race theory (CRT) is employed to discuss the operation, research, maintenance and impact of racial stratification. The power of this book is the innovative use of a stratification framework to expose the pervasiveness of racial inequality in the labour market. It teaches readers how to use CRT to investigate the racial hierarchy and it provides a replicable framework to identify the racial order based on insight from the Irish case. There is a four-stage framework in the book which helps readers understand how migrants navigate the labour market from the point of migration to labour participation. The book also highlights minority agency and how migrants respond to their marginality. The examples of how social acceptance can be applied in managing difference in the workplace are an added bonus for those interested in diversity and inclusion. This book is the first of its kind in Ireland and across Europe to present inequality, racism and discrimination in the labour market from a racial stratification perspective. While this book is based on Irish data, the CRT theoretical approach, as well as its insight into migrant perspectives, poses a strong appeal to scholars of sociology, social justice, politics, intercultural communication and economics with interest in race and ethnicity, critical whiteness and migration. It is a timely contribution to CRT which offers scholars a method to conduct empirical study of racial stratification across different countries bypassing the over-reliance on secondary data. It will also appeal to countries and scholars examining causal racism and how it shapes racial inequality.

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From the 'cocaine papers' to 'Irma's Injection'
Dave Boothroyd

4 Freud’s medicine: from the ‘cocaine papers’ to ‘Irma’s Injection’ Mixing psychoanalysis and psychopharmacology In an essay titled ‘What Good Are Psychoanalysts at a Time of Distress Oblivious to Itself?’ the French psychoanalyst and cultural theorist Julia Kristeva provides a succinct and striking image of the modern city and the place of drugs within it: I imagine a huge city with houses of glass and steel, reaching the sky, reflecting the sky, itself and you. People cultivate their image, hurried and made up in the extreme, covered in gold, pearls and pure

in Culture on drugs
Dave Boothroyd

drugs they complexify rather than simplify the relation of theorising to drugs by linking drugs to a discussion of psychoanalysis. In drawing this chapter to a close now I shall reconstruct their critico-clinical commentary. In ‘The Thirteenth Series’ of Logic of Sense, Deleuze had spoken of ‘bad psychoanalysis’ as the ‘psychoanalysis of sense’. As it is on ‘the surface’ that ‘the entire logic of sense is located’, the psychoanalysis which concerns itself with sense, ‘botches’ the clinical psychiatric aspect and the literary critical aspect simultaneously. For this

in Culture on drugs
Marcel Stoetzle

Schopenhauer, Horkheimer retained the notion that society is able to put ‘man’s need for metaphysics’ to work for many different ends. If one substitutes ‘eros’ or ‘libido’ for ‘need for metaphysics’, one arrives at the version of this idea that Critical Theory adopted from Freudian psychoanalysis. The integration of psychoanalysis into Marxian social theory was arguably Horkheimer’s most momentous contribution to social theory, although it was not an idea he came up with on his own. In 1928 Horkheimer underwent psychoanalysis with Karl Landauer (1887–1945; Landauer died in

in Beginning classical social theory
Abstract only
Anthony King

Action and Habermas’ other work. Thus, in Knowledge and Human Interests , he draws on psychoanalysis as a model for his critical theory. Psychoanalysis attempts to cure patients by helping them recognise the psychological repressions which bring them into contradiction with themselves. ‘Analysis has immediate therapeutic results because the critical overcoming of blocks to consciousness and the penetration of false objectivations initiates the appropriation of a lost portion of life history; it thus reverses a process of splitting-off’ (Habermas, 1971: 233). Through

in Human agents and social structures
Bogdan Popa

, which distinguishes between psychology (e.g., unconscious desires) and the structure of capitalism (the material production of capitalism). The assumption that the unconscious by itself can serve as a site for liberation from capitalism has deeply affected queer theory. Kevin Floyd observed that psychoanalysis had an important impact on gay liberation, and in particular, Herbert

in De-centering queer theory