Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 17 items for :

  • "psychoanalysis" x
  • Manchester Security, Conflict & Peace x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
The Other side
Author: Adrian Millar

Conducting an analysis of some of the most candid interview materials ever gathered from former Irish Republican Army (IRA) members and loyalists in Northern Ireland, this book demonstrates through a psychoanalysis of slips of the tongue, jokes, rationalisations and contradictions that it is the unconscious dynamics of the conflict — that is, the pleasure to be found in suffering, failure, domination, submission and ignorance, and in rivalry over jouissance — that lead to the reproduction of polarisation between the Catholic and Protestant communities. As a result, it contends that traditional approaches to conflict resolution which overlook the unconscious are doomed and argues that a Lacanian psychoanalytic understanding of socio-ideological fantasy has great potential for informing the way we understand and study all inter-religious and ethnic conflicts and, as such, deserves to be further developed in conflict-management processes. Whether readers find themselves agreeing with the arguments in the book or not, they are sure to find it a change from both traditional approaches to conflict resolution and the existing mainly conservative analyses of the Northern Ireland conflict.

Adrian Millar

Introduction Psychoanalysis plumbs the depths of how we imagine ourselves, how we establish worldviews and values, and how we relate out of these. 1 According to Anthony Elliott, psychoanalysis ‘powerfully accounts for the … essential and primary foundations of all human social activity’, 2 namely representation, fantasy, identification and

in Socio-ideological fantasy and the Northern Ireland conflict
Abstract only
Lindsey Dodd

, ‘Psychoanalysis and psychoanalysts in France between 1939 and 1945’, International Forum of Psychoanalysis, 12 (2003), pp. 136–7). Also, the Allied bombing was a delicate issue for medical publishing, as finding few detrimental effects of bombing among civilians might be seen as condoning Allied attacks on France, whereas negative effects would please Vichy and/or the Germans, which practitioners may have wished to avoid. Only after the liberation did psychologists, psychoanalysts and paediatricians begin to publish about war trauma (see, for example, R Charpentier, reviews of

in French children under the Allied bombs, 1940–45
Abstract only
Ian McEwan’s The Children Act and the limits of the legal practices in Menke’s ‘Law and violence’
Ben Morgan

Theory of Emotional Development (London:  Karnac and the Institute of Psycho-​Analysis, 1990), 145–​46. Ellen Spolsky has powerfully redeployed the term in her cognitively-​inflected response to deconstruction. E. Spolsky, “Darwin and Derrida: Cognitive Literary Theory as a Species of Post-​Structuralism,” Poetics Today, 23:1 (2002), 43–​62. 44 On primary and secondary rules, see Hart, The Concept of Law, 79–​99. 45 “No such question can arise as to the validity of the very rule of recognition which provides criteria; it can neither be valid nor invalid but is

in Law and violence
Abstract only
Adrian Millar

operate in conflict situations unless there is more fundamental change on the level of rationalisations that operate in the constitution of political identity and out of which structures develop. Below I consider change in Lacanian psychoanalysis. Lacanian change Psychoanalysis is concerned with social change. Freud saw the goal of psychoanalysis – the talking

in Socio-ideological fantasy and the Northern Ireland conflict
Abstract only
Adrian Millar

. In Chapter 1 I present an outline of Lacanian psychoanalysis and demonstrate that its development of the unconscious dynamics of identity construction helps explain the reproduction of socio-political conflict as participants indulge in fantasy and rival over jouissance . As Norval points out, in the construction of social and political identities people need to have theoretical tools which can

in Socio-ideological fantasy and the Northern Ireland conflict
Abstract only
Adrian Millar

aspects of their self-interpretation. They also need to take responsibility for the pain they inflict on others, the fictive aspects of their characters, their deceits and the pleasure they find in pain. For Lacan, ethics is a matter of pathological wrongs – the case where evil or transgressions are enjoyed at the expense of one’s neighbours. The challenge of psychoanalysis is to encourage Catholics and

in Socio-ideological fantasy and the Northern Ireland conflict
Abstract only
Adrian Millar

’ over ‘Irish barbarism’, and their removal of the Irish Other from their historiography. 4 These are attempts at self-idealisation. Added to these, the authors note that the Protestant People see their norms and beliefs as immutable, which evokes the immutability of the imago in Lacanian psychoanalysis, which the child perceives in the mirror and confuses with itself in the mirror stage. Their sense of

in Socio-ideological fantasy and the Northern Ireland conflict
Adrian Millar

holding both these views simultaneously. People compartmentalise attitudes and feelings to deal with complexity, as psychoanalysis attests. Likewise, on the issue of voting patterns, it is not hard to believe that people prioritised their goals and set the election of Bobby Sands to Parliament above any particular theological view they may or may not have had on the hunger strike itself. So the relevance of

in Socio-ideological fantasy and the Northern Ireland conflict
Abstract only
Pathologising security through Lacanian desire
Charlotte Heath-Kelly

linguistics into the frame. His psychic orders of the symbolic, imaginary and real describe the enmeshment of the subject within the world – combining Freudian psychoanalysis with linguistic structuralism. Lacan reinterprets the Freudian unconscious as a consequence of language (Tomšič and Zevnik 2015 : 2). As we discussed in the Introduction to

in Death and security