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Author: Jeremy Tambling

Not only did Sigmund Freud know literature intimately, and quote liberally from literatures of several languages, he has also inspired twentieth-century writers and philosophers, and created several schools of criticism, in literary and cultural studies. Freud was not just practising psychotherapy on his patients, helping them in difficult situations, but helping them by studying the unconscious as the basis of their problems. This book deals with Freud and psychoanalysis, and begins by analysing the 'Copernican revolution' which meant that psychoanalysis decentres the conscious mind, the ego. It shows how Freud illuminates literature, as Freud needs attention for what he says about literature. The book presents one of Freud's 'case-histories', where he discussed particular examples of analysis by examining obsessional neurosis, as distinct from hysteria. It analyses Freud on memory, in relation to consciousness, repression and the unconscious. Guilt was one of his central topics of his work, and the book explores it through several critical texts, 'Criminals from a Sense of Guilt', and 'The Ego and the Id'. The book discusses Melanie Klein, a follower of Freud, and object-relations theory, while also making a reference to Julia Kristeva. One of the main strands of thought of Jacques Lacan was the categories of the Imaginary, the Symbolic, and the Real, as well as paranoia and madness, which are linked to literature here. The book finally returns to Freud on hysteria, and examines him on paranoia in Daniel Paul Schreber, and the psychosis of the 'Wolf Man'.

Jeremy Tambling

’The Purloined Letter’ How do literature and psychoanalysis relate? The first produces the second; the second interprets the first, the first interrogates the second. Psychoanalysis, as an instance of critical theory, associates with Marx and Nietzsche in analysing modernity, while Marxism and Nietzschean philosophy both question psychoanalysis

in Literature and psychoanalysis
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Author: Nicholas Royle

This book provides a lucid, wide-ranging and up-to-date critical introduction to the writings of Hélène Cixous (1937–). Cixous is often considered ‘difficult’. Moreover she is extraordinarily prolific, having published dozens of books, essays, plays and other texts. Royle avoids any pretence of a comprehensive survey, instead offering a rich and diverse sampling. At once expository and playful, original and funny, this micrological approach enables a new critical understanding and appreciation of Cixous’s writing. If there is complexity in her work, Royle suggests, there is also uncanny simplicity and great pleasure. The book focuses on key motifs such as dreams, the supernatural, literature, psychoanalysis, creative writing, realism, sexual differences, laughter, secrets, the ‘Mother unconscious’, drawing, painting, autobiography as ‘double life writing’, unidentifiable literary objects (ULOs), telephones, non-human animals, telepathy and the ‘art of cutting’. Particular stress is given to Cixous’s work in relation to Sigmund Freud and Jacques Derrida, as well as to her importance in the context of ‘English literature’. There are close readings of Shakespeare, Emily Brontë, P. B. Shelley, Edgar Allan Poe, Lewis Carroll, Virginia Woolf, James Joyce and Samuel Beckett, for example, alongside in-depth explorations of her own writings, from Inside (1969) and ‘The Laugh of the Medusa’ (1975) up to the present. Royle’s book will be of particular interest to students and academics coming to Cixous’s work for the first time, but it will also appeal to readers interested in contemporary literature, creative writing, life writing, narrative theory, deconstruction, psychoanalysis, feminism, queer theory, ecology, drawing and painting.

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John Drakakis

are key to the construction of both plays’, and taken together they are the constituent elements of a concept that is ‘useful not as an attribute of characters but as one of plays: it is located textually rather than psychologically’. 50 In his Introductory Lectures on Psychoanalysis Freud offers the following definition: The term ‘traumatic’ has no other sense than an economic one. We apply it to an experience which within a short period of time presents the mind with an increase of

in Shakespeare’s resources
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John Drakakis

There is much to quibble about in Crane’s argument, not least its tendentious amalgamation of ‘Marxism’ and ‘psychoanalysis’ and its overlooking of the essentially linguistic basis of metaphor itself. But it does raise some fascinating questions about the Shakespearean ‘subject’, the Shakespearean ‘self’ and, of course, Shakespearean agency. Shakespeare, it is often asserted, was not a literary or theatrical inventor , the original source of the plays that are attributed to him, but a bricoleur , one who

in Shakespeare’s resources
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Freud’s Copernican revolution
Jeremy Tambling

Freud’s biography Before discussing psychoanalysis and literature, we must ask the question: who was Freud, creator of psychoanalysis, whose name, as an adjective – ‘Freudian’ – invokes unconscious thought and motivations, and sexuality? He was born on 6 May 1856, in Pribor, then called Freiberg, in Moravia, in the now Czech Republic, then part of

in Literature and psychoanalysis
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Dreamer, realist, analyst, writing
Nicholas Royle

the inventiveness of her work through the rich and strange resources of English itself. ‘Rich and strange’ is Shakespeare’s phrase, in The Tempest (Act 1, scene 2), for the ‘sea-change’ that happens to the bones of the dead; Cixous, as we will see, does rich and strange things with the language of Shakespeare, as well as with the bones of the dead. 4 This book attempts to do something new, namely to provide readers with a way into Cixous’s work that does not presuppose an extensive familiarity with feminist theory, deconstruction or psychoanalysis. It aspires to

in Hélène Cixous
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Jeremy Tambling

This chapter strikes out on a pathway of charting how Freud considered memory, as one of the processes working through the subject, and I will do so through a specific ‘case-history’. Although Freud thought psychoanalysis was in the pursuit of truth, the speculative nature of his writing, and the different, irreconcilable models of thought, set side by side alongside each

in Literature and psychoanalysis
Nicholas Royle

To awake, Shakespeare of the Night you shake off the night, no, you night without shaking off anything unless the name, for which you search, or the name that is searching for you, you remain in that state I hesitate to call hypnopompic, first because that doesn’t seem especially consonant with how their psychoanalysis works or psychoanalysis works there, not consonant because in truth they don’t mess about, they’re off, already away as if with the fairies or with fairy, like being with child, their fairies there be, with everything that links fairy to

in Hélène Cixous
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Nicholas Royle

Side thinking might, however, seem a possible name for what was going on elsewhere at the time and is still being elaborated, another thinking of language which if it is to be described as ‘linguistic turn’ is a veering also into the body, of the body, and entails just as much new ways of construing what is beyond language, a new thinking of psychoanalysis, of a Freud beside himself (what she writes about so hauntingly, for instance, in ‘Fiction and Its Phantoms’ in 1974). 22 It’s a new thinking of ‘femininity’s side’ (as she calls it in ‘Sorties’, hence the

in Hélène Cixous