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Abstract only
Hanneke Canters and Grace M. Jantzen

emerging woman subject in philosophy and psychoanalysis, and hints at the new avenues of thought which are opened up for women and men when the implications of female subjectivity are taken seriously. Forever Fluid presents an invitation to us as authors and to you our readers to move into uncharted territory without clear disciplinary demarcations, to discover what happens when female subjects are treated with the same consideration as male subjects have been. The recognition of a female subject is relatively recent in Western philosophy Through Western intellectual

in Forever fluid
Hanneke Canters and Grace M. Jantzen

CHAPTER 5 Interpretative synopsis of Elemental Passions Images for a female subject Introduction Elemental Passions has given us an insight into a new way of thinking, using images of fluidity which reconfigure sexual difference and thereby subvert the rigidity of the binary logic of traditional philosophy and psychoanalysis. In this chapter we would like to select some of the most important of these images which have emerged in the commentary on Elemental Passions and look at them in more detail. We suggest that these unaccustomed images of fluidity could

in Forever fluid
Context and style of Elemental Passions
Hanneke Canters and Grace M. Jantzen

Problems of rigidity CHAPTER 3 ‘Fragments from a woman’s voyage’: context and style of Elemental Passions Elemental Passions makes few concessions to the reader. Both in style and content it is elusive, open to various interpretations. Unlike most texts of traditional Western philosophy and psychoanalysis which argue a thesis or develop a point of view, Elemental Passions invites the reader inside, makes suggestions to enable the reader to set off on her own journey rather than follow predetermined steps laid out by somebody else. The original text of Elemental

in Forever fluid
Heather Walton

Lacanian community and the loss of her lecturing position in the Department of Psychoanalysis at the University of Vincennes. After this break Irigaray continued her research and served as a Director of the Centre National de la Récherche Scientifique in Paris. The work of an empirical researcher into gender and linguistic practice was pursued in tandem with the unorthodox reflections upon psychoanalysis, philosophy and theology for which she is better known. The narrative of Irigaray’s expulsion from her lecturing position can be seen as a parabolic representation of

in Literature, theology and feminism
Heather Walton

’s influence on her child’s development into an independent being, language acquisition, the child’s dependency upon the mother, the mother’s role in language and symbolic processing, the nature of women’s writing and women’s art’ (1996c: 7). The symbolic, the imaginary and the real Kristeva’s arrival in France coincided with the publication of Lacan’s Écrits (1973 [1966]). Their impact upon Kristeva was immense. Lacanian psychoanalysis appeared to offer the means of linking her various concerns into a coherent project. Initially Lacan’s thinking was a significant resource

in Literature, theology and feminism
David Geiringer

, calling in leading experts from the new intellectual disciplines that had come to redefine the sexual in the preceding decades. Specialists were drawn from established fields like biology, medicine and theology, but a particular emphasis was placed on engaging with the ‘new sciences of man’ such as sociology, anthropology, psychology and psychoanalysis. The process of ‘taking in’ the expertise of these

in The Pope and the pill
Irigaray and psychoanalytic theory
Hanneke Canters and Grace M. Jantzen

mascu–linist assumption of the supreme value of the penis: what would happen to Freud’s theory if women make different assumptions, and perhaps have different wishes and desires? (Sp 51 ). What if woman is B rather than not–A? Irigaray argues that the desire for the self–identical is reflected in the methods and aim of psychoanalysis, and that the self–identical is modelled upon the male. It therefore excludes female desires other than those which fit into (patriarchal) theory (Sp 32–4 ff). lrigaray and psychoanalytic theory Irigaray strengthens her point by showing

in Forever fluid
David Geiringer

a similar turnabout for distributors of Catholic sexual advice. Marriage guidance provided by Catholic authorities before the 1960s tended to be sceptical of, if not downright hostile towards, psychoanalysis. A collection of frequently asked questions for Catholic couples, first broadcast on radio by Frs Rumble and Carty and then published in a booklet, set out the ‘Church’s’ opinion of Freud in

in The Pope and the pill
David Geiringer

selfhood. Erik Erikson extended Freud’s ‘developmental theory’ in his work of 1950, Childhood and Society , identifying childhood as a determinative stage in the ‘psychosocial development’ of religious identities. 64 In the same year, Erich Fromm published Psychoanalysis and Religion , which argued that religion primarily constituted a childish desire to remain attached

in The Pope and the pill
Carmen Mangion

welcoming the International Congress of Psychotherapy to Rome in 1953. 84 There is little evidence to suggest that psychology was used by sisters and nuns in Britain in the 1950s, but this awareness may have sown the seeds for the embrace of psychoanalysis in the late 1960s and 1970s. 85 This thinking replicated messages in the nun memoirs and Bride of a King : today’s novice was different from her predecessor. It adds, however, an important innovation – the novice mistress in revising her teaching methods must ‘adjust herself’ and, by implication, the convent too

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age