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Female masturbation and its consequences
Diane Mason

, theatre and scenic walks all available for its guests’, ignoring the town’s medical reputation. See: J. Bierman, ‘A Crucial Stage in the Writing of Dracula ’, in William Hughes and Andrew Smith (eds), Bram Stoker: History, Psychoanalysis and the Gothic (Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1998), pp. 151–72, at p. 153. 83 Pierce, People’s Commonsense Medical Adviser , p. 751. 84 Kellogg, Ladies’ Guide , pp. 150, 151. 85 After being vampirised, animal analogies are frequently evoked to describe

in The secret vice
Conflicting signifiers of vice in The Picture of Dorian Gray and The Mystery of Edwin Drood
Diane Mason

, as malignant as the Evil One’ (p. 279). 86 Browne, ‘Opiophagism’, p. 41. 87 Patricia Anderson, When Passion Reigned: Sex and the Victorians (New York: Basic Books, 1995), p. 57. 88 Robert Mighall, ‘Sex, History and the Vampire’ in William Hughes and Andrew Smith (eds), Bram Stoker: History, Psychoanalysis and the Gothic (Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1998), pp. 62–77, at p. 74. 89 Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, Between Men: English Literature and Male Homosocial

in The secret vice
Diamonds and curious collectables in the fin-de-siècle fiction of Richard Marsh
Jessica Allsop

the White Worm’, in W. Hughes and A. Smith (eds), Bram Stoker: History, Psychoanalysis and the Gothic (Basingstoke and New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 1998), pp. 188–204; A. Worth, ‘Arthur Machen and the horrors of deep history’, Victorian Literature and Culture, 40 (2012), 215–27; S. Forlini, ‘Modern narratives and decadent things in Arthur Machen’s The Three Impostors’, English Literature in Transition, 1880–1920, 55:4 (2012), 479–98.  2 A notable exception is Aviva Briefel’s ‘Hands of beauty, hands of horror: fear and Egyptian art at the fin de siècle’, Victorian

in Richard Marsh, popular fiction and literary culture, 1890–1915