Search results

You are looking at 1 - 6 of 6 items for :

  • Methods and Guides x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Andrew Balmer and Anne Murcott

Case study 1: a paragraph from an essay on race and ethnicity Extracted from an essay on black feminism, the following paragraph begins to distinguish black feminism from Western feminism as a basis for reviewing contributions that black feminists have made to feminism more generally together with evaluating their strengths and weaknesses. This is an important paragraph because it contains a point that is crucial to the argument about the way black feminists have criticised Western feminists for homogenising gendered experience. The student shows

in The craft of writing in sociology
Andrew Balmer and Anne Murcott

good idea to go over in depth the readings that were required for the lectures, seminars and workshops that covered the topic identified by the essay. An important element in understanding materials specific to the essay topic is to position them in the context of the issues dealt with in the course as a whole. So, for instance, imagine you are taking a course on ‘Race and Ethnicity’ and you are writing an essay on ‘Whiteness and Class’. Focusing on readings around whiteness and class will be important, but equally important will be understanding how those readings

in The craft of writing in sociology
Abstract only
Andrew Balmer and Anne Murcott

cultural norm are explained by Dyer (1997: 9): White people create the dominant images of the world and don’t quite see that they thus construct the world in their own image; white people set standards of humanity by which they are bound to succeed and others bound to fail. The function of the norm of race in constructing such a world allows those who deviate from the norm to be labelled as different. In the example above (which is, of course, also indented here to make it easy for you to spot the quotation from her essay), you should be

in The craft of writing in sociology
Abstract only
Clare Wilkinson and Emma Weitkamp

citizens. Such democracies have been plagued throughout history with questions surrounding who can participate (with regard to wealth, property, title, occupation, literacy, gender and race) and how active that participation should be. Historically, these approaches have been associated to two main models of democracy: direct or participatory democracy, where citizens are directly involved in decision making, and liberal or representative democracy, in which elected officials represent the interests and views of citizens (Held, 2006 ). Whilst democracies now largely

in Creative research communication
Abstract only
Clare Wilkinson and Emma Weitkamp

occurring in settings such as museums, cultural institutions and science centres. John Falk’s Identity Visitors Model, summarised in Box 3.3 , similarly applies segmentation techniques to such locations, focusing not on what Falk describes as the capital ‘I’ identities of visitors (such as gender, race, nationality and so forth) but on the lower case ‘i’, the more discreet and minor influences on our identities such as friendship, family status or our employment, which Falk ( 2011 : 144) argues have a considerable impact on our ‘day-to-day decision making, including

in Creative research communication
Abstract only
Clare Wilkinson and Emma Weitkamp

activity we interact with people from different backgrounds and social situations and with varying needs and requirements. These can impinge not only on the wider considerations of how to design an activity but also on the practical considerations that might be made within it. Discrimination can occur on a variety of bases, but the key issues that may impinge on a research context are perhaps those based on disability, race, religion, sex and age. Discrimination does not always occur on purpose, and in a research communication context you should be most cautious about

in Creative research communication