Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 17 items for :

  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
H. J. Fleure
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
James Pereiro

The article explores some aspects of the intellectual climate of the first half of the nineteenth century and the new ideas about race and national identity. These in turn help to explain contemporary changes in historical perspective, particularly in respect to the English Reformation. Disraeli‘s novels reflect the ideas of the time on the above topics and echo contemporary historians in their views on the Reformation, its causes, and the religious and social changes that it brought about.

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Alan Thacker

The Venerable Bede has often been held as creator of a single collective identity for the Germanic inhabitants of Britain: the English (gens Anglorum). This article examines how Bede crafted his notion of Englishness, reviewing his use of terms for nation, race and peoples to exclude those of whom he did not approve. It included the Northumbrians and the people of Kent whom Bede regarded as the progenitors of the English Church. It excluded the Mercians who were rivals and sometime enemies of Bede‘s own people, the Northumbrians. By the time Bede finished his account (731) the term gens Anglorum had begun to lose its usefulness in binding together the Northumbrians and Kentishmen as custodians of a unitary Church. After Bede terminology remained unstable, writers such as Boniface or Alcuin being as likely to call the people of England Saxons as Angles/English. Bedes role as the father of Englishness is thus here nuanced and seen to be historically contingent.

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Joseph Hardwick

the predominantly English-speaking Eastern Townships said cholera had nurtured a ‘sympathy’ and ‘sensibility’ that extended itself ‘beyond the narrow precincts’ of the community’s ‘personal concerns’. 30 Such comments perhaps reflected an intellectual climate in which Britishness was not defined in ‘exclusive race terms’, and when notions about the unity, similarity and educability of all humans predominated. 31 Nevertheless, imperial acts of special worship in the later nineteenth century became

in Prayer, providence and empire
Stephen Penn

human race, the whole trinity ordained that he should be incarnated as its son, and speak with men at the gravest times. Therefore, each of those seven gifts is revealed to the faithful proportionately, as the blessed rinity thought that knowledge should be imparted to them. It is taken as a principle of faith, first of all, that these seven gifts, like certain universals, are sufficient to satisfy the whole of the soul, to an end that is agreeable to the viator. Whatever a man has learnt beyond those seven, therefore, is less superfluous than injurious. And thus the

in John Wyclif
Stephen Penn

in a charitable act, so that he or she is not consigned to damnation because he or she has not been baptised with baptism of water. And it is clear that it is impossible for original sin to inhere in the human race when it is not actually in a human soul, because nothing is subject to original sin except a man, and he is not a man unless he has an intellective soul. His matter does not sin any more than the branch or the trunk of a tree. Original sin is nothing but a culpable defect in moral righteousness, which dates from the origin of the human race. All

in John Wyclif
Stephen Penn

through grace. And then the next conclusion is noted: because nobody can have such salvation except Christ or any member of his, he is also, by that very fact, beneath the aforementioned church. Therefore, the conclusion; and to this end, examples follow. Just as the whole inheritance of the human race was virtually and materially in the first carnal union initially, so the whole inheritance of Christians is virtually in Christ and the church, and consequently, in the first spiritual marriage. For to those born of God he thus gave the power to

in John Wyclif
Joseph Hardwick

prayed for rain but who overstocked the land and failed to store water and hay to ease animal suffering. 41 An anthropological journal said a similar thing in 1903 when it complained that ‘in this land they only pray for rain instead of storing and using it when it comes’. 42 Others brought race into the debate about praying for rain. Petitionary prayer and days for humiliation were primitive rituals, comparable to the invocations for rain offered by indigenous peoples. Such practices collapsed the supposed differences

in Prayer, providence and empire
Cara Delay

they did so, Irish women participated in a contemporary dialogue about race, class, religion, and gender that was common across Britain and the rest of Europe. In her work on lay women and philanthropy, Margaret Preston asserts that female philanthropists in nineteenth-century Dublin used language that ‘mirrored the paternalism informing the relationship between middle- and upper-class philanthropists and Dublin’s poorer classes’.121 women and catholic culture 37 These middle-class and elite women, in Ireland and elsewhere in the Western world, were able to use

in Irish women and the creation of modern Catholicism, 1850–1950
David Geiringer

encouraged more of a focus on some issues, and less on others. For example, the lack of consideration of homosexuality, or the significance of race, is a consequence of the design and sample of the oral history research. 5 In reference to the Mass Observation Project (MOP), Annebella Pollen has argued that

in The Pope and the pill