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John Mundy and Glyn White

in’ (2007: 20). This notion that comedy can be a Janus-like process, a barrier as well as an entrance, both a ‘sword and a shield’, is important when we attempt to understand the relationship between comedy, race and ethnicity. Comic material in broadcasting and film can, as we have seen, have different meanings for different audiences at different times, but it invariably relies a great deal on

in Laughing matters
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Anamik Saha

2 Scheduling race Anamik Saha Writing in the mid-1980s, Nicholas Garnham describes broadcasting as the ‘heartland of contemporary cultural practice’. While television in terms of its production and – especially – consumption has been radically transformed by the impact of new digital technologies, Garnham’s point about the centrality of television to a nation’s cultural life still remains. This is not least ‘because of the high proportion of consumers’ time and money devoted to it and because, as a result of that concentration of attention, it is itself both

in Adjusting the contrast
Gandhi (1982), A Chorus Line (1985) and Cry Freedom (1987)
Sally Dux

Race, nation and conflict: Gandhi (1982), A Chorus Line (1985) and Cry Freedom (1987) 5 The 1980s marked the apotheosis of Richard Attenborough’s directorial career in which he fulfilled his twenty-year ambition of realising a film on the life of Mahatma Gandhi. As well as being a personal achievement for Attenborough, Gandhi represented a key moment for the British film industry through its success at the box office and led to national pride by winning eight of the eleven Academy Awards for which it was nominated, the greatest acclaim to that date for a

in Richard Attenborough
Darrell M. Newton

3658 Paving the empire road:Layout 1 30/6/11 08:45 Page 16 1 Radio, race, and the Television Service Well one thing I think that will interest West Indians is what is the attitude – of the English people as a whole, – how do they take to strangers. After all West Indians are coming over here in increasing numbers, and they’d like to know what sort of person they’re going to meet, and how they’re going to be treated. (West Indian humorist and Government Public Relations officer for Jamaica, A.E.T. Henry, on the BBC radio programme We See Britain, 1 June 1949

in Paving the empire road
Ian Scott

race war and he confessed to being an avowed white supremacist. His actions reached back into what Jelani Cobb described, a week after the murders, as the ‘vintage rationalisations for terrorist violence in American history’. Roof reputedly told one of his victims that: ‘You are raping our women and taking over the country.’ These agitations were precisely the ones expressed in a cultural touchstone for views on violence and miscegenation that Cobb highlighted: D.W. Griffith's 1915 film, The Birth of a Nation . 2 Griffith's portrayal of the rise of the Ku

in The films of Costa-Gavras
BBC television and Black Britons

This book provides an institutional case study of the BBC Television Service, as it undertook the responsibility of creating programmes that addressed the impact of black Britons, their attempts to establish citizenship within England and subsequent issues of race relations and colour prejudice. Beginning in the 1930s and into the post millennium, the book provides a historical analysis of policies invoked, and practices undertaken, as the Service attempted to assist white Britons in understanding the impact of African-Caribbeans on their lives, and their assimilation into constructs of Britishness. Management soon approved talks and scientific studies as a means of examining racial tensions, as ITV challenged the discourses of British broadcasting. Soon after, BBC 2 began broadcasting, and more issues of race appeared on the TV screens, each reflecting sometimes comedic, somewhat dystopic, often problematic circumstances of integration. In the years that followed, however, social tensions, such as those demonstrated by the Nottingham and Notting Hill riots, led to transmissions that included a series of news specials on Britain's Colour Bar, and docudramas, such as A Man From the Sun, which attempted to frame the immigrant experience for British television audiences, but from the African-Caribbean point of view. Subsequent chapters include an extensive analysis of television programming, along with personal interviews. Topics include current representations of race, the future of British television, and its impact upon multiethnic audiences. Also detailed are the efforts of Black Britons working within the British media as employees of the BBC, writers, producers and actors.

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Medicine in television period drama

This collection examines the representation of medicine and medical practices in period drama on television. It explores the fascination that the genre has with the history of illness and the medical profession, which is apparent in the huge number of shows which have medicine as either their narrative focus or as important subplots. Chapter topics are interdisciplinary in nature and range from the professionalisation of medicine in Poldark to the representation of mental illness in Peaky Blinders. This volume reflects on the ways popular culture has constructed and considered the frailty of the human body, the progress – or otherwise – of science, the intersection of medicine, race, class, and gender, and the provision of public healthcare. These dramas do not only reveal much about how we view our corporeal past, however. All these issues are still pertinent today, and frequently they also function as a commentary on, and often a critique of, the issues surrounding medicine in the present day – in particular debates around public health provision, the politics of reproduction, genetic testing and research, and global pandemics.

Open Access (free)
Editor: Paul Grainge

As a technology able to picture and embody the temporality of the past, cinema has become central to the mediation of memory in modern cultural life. The memory of film scenes and movies screens, cinema and cinema-going, has become integral to the placement and location of film within the cultural imagination of this century and the last. This book is a sustained, interdisciplinary perspective on memory and film from early cinema to the present. The first section examines the relationship between official and popular history and the constitution of memory narratives in and around the production and consumption of American cinema. The second section examines the politics of memory in a series of chapters that take as their focus three pivotal sites of national conflict in postwar America. This includes the war in Vietnam, American race relations and the Civil Rights Movement, and the history of marginality in the geographic and cultural borderlands of the US. The book explores the articulation of Vietnam. The final section concentrates on the issue of mediation; it explores how technological and semiotic shifts in the cultural terrain have influenced the coding and experience of memory in contemporary cinema. It considers both the presence of music and colour in nostalgia films of the 1990s and the impact of digital and video technologies on the representational determinants of mediated memory. The book also examines the stakes of cultural remembering in the United States and the means by which memory has been figured through Hollywood cinema.

British television and constructs of race

Adjusting the contrast National and cultural identity, ethnicity and difference have always been major themes within the national psyche. People are witnessing the rise and visibility of far-right politics and counter-movements in the UK and USA. Simultaneously, there is an urgent need to defend the role of public service media. This book emerges at a time when these shifts and conjunctures that impact on and shape how 'race' and racial difference are perceived. They are coinciding with rapidly changing media contexts and environments and the kinds of racial representations that are constructed within public service broadcasting (PSB), specifically the BBC and Channel 4. The book explores a range of texts and practices that address the ongoing phenomenon of race and its relationship to television. Policies and the management of race; transnationalism and racial diversity; historical questions of representation; the myth of a multicultural England are also explored. It interrogates three television primarily created by women, written by women, feature women in most of the lead roles, and forcefully reassert the place of women in British history. The book contributes to the range of debates around television drama and black representation, examining BBC's Shoot the Messenger and Top Boy. Finally, it explores some of the history that led to the belated breakthrough of Black and Asian British comedy. The book also looks at the production of jokes about race and colour prior to the 1980s and 1990s, and questioning what these jokes tell us about British multiculturalism in this period.

Melodramatic and moral readings of gay conversion therapy in A Place to Call Home
Alley-Young Gordon R.

A Place to Call Home is a televised serial family drama set in post-WWII Australia (1950s–1960s) that chronicles the lives of the Bligh family from the fictional rural town of Inverness, New South Wales, Australia. A key storyline of the series is that of eldest son James who has returned from England with his new bride while hiding his homosexuality. James ultimately attempts to change his sexual orientation, also called sexual orientation change efforts (SOCE), at a private clinic. This chapter critically examines the televisual depiction of James’s SOCE through several lenses that draw upon critical scholarship about melodrama and period drama as media genres for depicting LGBTQ+ histories, studies of post-WWII family and society (e.g., the rise of science/medicine as a cure-all for perceived social ills), and postcolonial theories of race and sexuality (e.g., the propagation of the white European heteronormative family). Depictions of James’s SOCE experience are read through historical accounts of individuals who have survived SOCE to address issues of realism and how televisual frames change how we understand SOCE, specifically how the elements of melodrama are used to accentuate affective and psychological aspects of James’s experience to elicit audience empathy/sympathy and thus social acceptance of homosexuality. The chapter considers the impact that the series could have had on Australia’s same-sex marriage debate and plebiscite that were occurring as James’s storyline was playing out on Australian television.

in Diagnosing history