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C. E. Beneš

cases he boasts of it. As Augustine says, so great is the perversity of the human race that anyone should ever fear embarrassment for seeming chaste among the unchaste . 24 Finally, he does not fear the punishment of the law because laws do not condemn fornicating men as they do fornicating women. Now, the aforementioned philosopher Aureolus also asks whether a woman ought to be controlled by a man. His answer

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
C. E. Beneš

faith of Christ. The third chapter supports this same assertion through reason. Chapter one: How the entire world was enslaved to the cult of idolatry before the advent of Christ. Before the advent of Christ the human race was blinded by the shadows of sin, so much that nearly all of them abandoned the true God and venerated many false idols; they made statues of gold and silver, offering divine

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
C. E. Beneš

, ‘Come to me, you venal race of men, and bathe here with me, because I have saved the best spot for you’. 57 Beyond this, Orosius records that greedy judges and rulers will fulfil the words of another [philosopher]: there was a certain man who always thirsted for gold and could not be satisfied. Then he was captured by his enemies, and they poured boiling liquid gold into his mouth, saying, ‘You thirsted for gold

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
C. E. Beneš

converted her husband to the faith of Christ and in this way the entire people adopted the faith of Christ. 29 See how many good things follow from a good woman! For a woman—a queen by the name of Clotilde—caused the conversion of the entire race of Franks ( Franci ) to the faith of Christ, as was recounted in the preceding chapter. These Gauls ( Gallici ) were converted to the

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
C. E. Beneš

displeased the emperor greatly, particularly when he learned that Innocent was going to Lyons intending to convene a council against him and depose him as emperor—as indeed he went and did so depose him. 33 But the Genoese did not much care about Frederick's humiliation. Furthermore, the race of the Saracens often felt the might of the Genoese. For the Genoese besieged and captured many famous cities of theirs, namely

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
C. E. Beneš

voice of weeping . 218 For that same year, in the month of December—namely, five days after the Nativity of the Lord—while our citizens rejoiced in the aforementioned peace, the enemy of the human race, begrudging the peace, threw our citizens into such discord and tumult that they clashed in hand to hand combat through the alleys and piazzas, and for many days they contended angrily against one another. From this

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
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Mayke de Jong and Justin Lake

the indomitable race of the Abodrites 229 was proclaimed thereafter to have won greater glory by bearing the standards of the virtues against the monstrosities of vice. Consequently, he who once spurned the honours of this world on behalf of the faith now bears the prize of victory as his reward. Chapter 12 Adeodatus: We know all of this. But I would like you to talk about the manner of his life under our Antonius, for the particular benefit of our brothers living in Saxony, whose nation he belonged to, 230 so that they might know more fully what sort of

in Confronting crisis in the Carolingian empire
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Gervase Rosser

the bit, stepping high with jaunty tread; there are the sumpter-horses,* powerful and spirited; and after them there are the war-horses, costly, elegant of form, noble of stature, with ears quickly tremulous, necks raised and large haunches. As these show their paces, the buyers first try those of gentler gait, then those of quicker pace whereby the fore and hind feet move in pairs together. When a race

in Towns in medieval England
Rachel Stone and Charles West

This chapter contains the translated text ofDe divortio. It has several underlying sections, responding to the questions that Hincmar initially received. These sections were, however, further divided to make the twenty-three responses which appear in the manuscript. The original sections are as follows: the procedure at the councils of Aachen, rules on marriage, divorce and remarriage, the validity of ordeals, the next steps in Theutberga's case, the sodomy charge, Lothar's relationship with Waldrada and sorcery, Lothar's possibilities of remarriage, and the response of bishops towards appeals to them and the case of Engeltrude. De divortio also deals with seven further questions which Hincmar received six months after the first: who is able to judge the king, can the king avoid further judgement in the case, the case of Engeltrude, and the effects of communion with the king.

in The divorce of King Lothar and Queen Theutberga
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Trevor Dean

political and religious. The palio , which has given its name to the race, was actually the first prize, made out of some rich fabric. Such races were run in many cities on the important feast-days. C. Guasti, Le feste di San Giovanni Batista in Firenze descritte in prose e in rima da contemporanei (Florence, 1884), pp. 4

in The towns of Italy in the later Middle Ages