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Playing black in late seventeenth-century France and Spain
Noémie Ndiaye

foreign queen consorts influenced the circulation of racial representations across European borders (Ndiaye 2016 ). For more examples of transnational queen consorts’ cultural influence at large, see Britland ( 2006 ), Gough ( 2005 ) and Cole (Chapter 10 in this volume). 7 Among the most representative

in Transnational connections in early modern theatre
Detection, deviance and disability in Richard Marsh’s Judith Lee stories
Minna Vuohelainen

’, in Adventures of Judith Lee, pp. 39–73 (p. 60); subsequent references to this story are given in the text. 36 Bardi, ‘Gypsy as Trope’, p. 15. 37 Nord, Gypsies and the British Imagination, p. 6. 38 B. Cheyette, Constructions of ‘the Jew’ in English Literature and Society: Racial Representations, 1875–1945 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993), pp. 9, 12. 39 Nord, Gypsies and the British Imagination, p. 3. 40 Marsh, ‘Conscience’, p. 460; ‘Restaurant Napolitain’, p. 687. 41 J. Höglund, ‘Black Englishness and concurrent voices in Richard Marsh’s The

in Richard Marsh, popular fiction and literary culture, 1890–1915
Kipling and the Jews
Bryan Cheyette

Orwell, ‘Rudyard Kipling’ (1942), on p. 29 of this volume. 15 Arendt, Origins of Totalitarianism, p. 267. 16 Boris Ford, ‘A Case for Kipling?’, in Elliot L. Gilbert, Kipling and the Critics (London: Peter Owen, 1966), p. 62. 17 Anne Aresty Naman, The Jew in the Victorian Novel: Some Relationships between Prejudice and Art (New York: AMS Press, 1980), p. 49, discussed in Bryan Cheyette, Constructions of ‘the Jew’ in English Literature and Society: Racial Representations, 1875–1945 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995), pp. 1–12. For the dangers of ‘back

in In Time’s eye
Open Access (free)
Philip Roth, antisemitism and the Holocaust
David Brauner

2015a). 29 However, it also underpins J and appears, implicitly, in the form of one of the books that Esme gives Ailinn to educate her, albeit obliquely, about Jewish history: ‘It was her forbears’ austerity of conscience, according to one writer, that had always troubled humanity and explained the hostility they encountered wherever they went . . . [t]hey set too high a standard’ ( Jacobson 2014a : 312). There is also perhaps an echo of Bryan Cheyette’s thesis in Constructions of ‘The Jew’ in English Literature and Society: Racial Representations, 1875

in Howard Jacobson