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Queer Theory‘s Debt to the Gothic
Mair Rigby

Focusing on the productive sense of recognition that queer theorists have articulated in relation to the Gothic, this article proposes that the relationship which has developed between queer theory and Gothic fiction reveals the significant role the genre has played in the construction of ‘queerness’ as an uncanny condition.

Gothic Studies
Drunkenness and the Southern Gothic in Flannery O’Connor‘s The Violent Bear It Away
Lindsey Michael Banco

This essay explores a link, previously unremarked, in the Southern Gothic novelist Flannery O’Connors The Violent Bear It Away (1960) between the drunkenness of the novels protagonist and the idiot child he is compelled to baptize. Inspired by the possibility that much of the canon of American literature contains a symbolic economy of alcohol – what John Crowley calls ‘the White Logic’ – I argue that aligning the child with intoxication produces a poetics of addiction that helps explain the redemptive, revelatory climax of the novel in which O’Connors protagonist fulfills his religious destiny. The novel thus calls for a more complex understanding in American Gothic literature of the protean nature of intoxication.

Gothic Studies
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South East Asian Womens Postcolonial Gothic
Gina Wisker

Fantasy and the supernatural are everyday expressions of the imaginative experiences of Malaysian and Singaporean women writers who use the Gothic to explore and expose the contradictions within their societies, constraints upon peoples lives, and most specifically, womens roles. In tales of wealthy families and their bondmaids, growing up, investment, education, marriages, the supernatural and fantasy run everywhere alongside realistic factual accounts to critique contradictions, and highlight little ironies, some of which have been generated by or supported by the,colonial presence, and some of which emanate from their own cultural traditions. Many cultural and individual contradictions are generated by recognition of the need to simultaneously maintain what is valuable in tradition, benefit from what was brought by colonialism, and move on to create new ways of being. Through the gaps and fissures of colonial homes and those of grand Chinese or Malay families leak tales of repression and silencing legitimated by cultural, economic and gendered differences. The repressed return, as they do in all good Gothic tales, to bring cultural and personal discrepancies to the notice of the living.

Gothic Studies
Julian Goodare

, between them, may be able to tell us something of what was typical. The search for typicality should not exclude a recognition of the individuality of each visionary’s experience, but common themes do emerge. How did the visionaries form and negotiate their relationship with their spirit-guide? What emotions did they experience? And what emotions did they attribute to the spirit-guide? Questions like this will arise periodically during the following analysis. What was the structure of the relationship between the human visionary and the spirit-guide? To answer this

in The supernatural in early modern Scotland
Domhnall Uilleam Stiùbhart

foretell aright. 59 It is surely significant that the earliest written reference in England to Second Sight recorded by Michael Hunter, in the diarist John Evelyn’s commonplace book, directly follows a discussion on the secretive indication of recognition known as the ‘Mason Word’, both being mysterious phenomena regarded as peculiarly Scottish. 60 This association is also touched on by the Rev. Robert Kirk in his writings on the Second Sight, while in his correspondence with John Aubrey, the Aberdonian scholar Professor James Garden tellingly equates Second

in The supernatural in early modern Scotland
Phrenology in the British Isles
William Hughes

the local press. 95 From Liverpool Spurzheim travelled in May – again apparently without significant publicity or printed recognition – first to Manchester and then to the county town of Lancaster, before visiting the Lake District. He then ‘made an extensive tour in Scotland’ across June 1816, visiting ‘Glasgow, Dumbarton, Inverness, Banff, Aberdeen, Perth, and Stirling’ before arriving in Edinburgh on the 24th of the month. Again, there is seemingly no published record of

in The dome of thought
Mesmerism, celebrity practitioners and the schism of 1842–3
William Hughes

, moreover, often representatives of a new practitioner demographic, their relatively humble origins and modest education in many cases being of the same order as that enjoyed by their demotic auditors. Like the hybrid system of phreno-magnetism, these individuals have been regarded as little more than a footnote to the history of phrenology, and their functional role in the later culture of the pseudoscience demands recognition. Similarly, the functional place of phreno-magnetism in that troubled history, with its freighting of professional and social rivalries, and its

in The dome of thought
The case of Pier Paolo Pasolini
Michael Mack

. Examples of such a disruptive or contaminative scenario can be found in the ending of almost all of Pasolini’s films. In the closing scene of Mamma Roma , this is exemplified when Anna Magnani’s manic stare of recognition prompts the spectator to realise that the view from her middle-class apartment actually coincides with the feared-for morbidity of a cemetery – the view of her previous working

in Incest in contemporary literature
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Ethical virtue in Iris Murdoch’s The Black Prince (1973) and Simone de Beauvoir’s The Mandarins (1954)
Miles Leeson

’s Fiction (2005) makes clear connections between Murdoch and Beauvoir: Beauvoir maintains that women generally do not engage in this struggle [the struggle for reciprocal recognition] with their male partners as they fail to present men with the hard exigencies of a reciprocal recognition. That is, the male

in Incest in contemporary literature
Narrative, affect and judgement in and across the Lolitas
Matthew Pateman

the productive eroticism of naming, as an attempted salve for his recognition of the destructive obscenity of raping, and incest. He has written a text whose name is ‘Lolita’: not the novel that also bears the same name, but the object to which his whole aching body is directed. ‘Lolita, light of my life, fire of my loins. My sin, my soul. Lo-lee-ta: the tip of the tongue taking a trip of three steps down the palate to

in Incest in contemporary literature