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Robert Z. Birdwell

Go Tell It on the Mountain sheds light on James Baldwin’s response to his Pentecostal religious inheritance. Baldwin writes protagonist John Grimes’s experience of “salvation” as an act of his own break with his past and the inauguration of a new vocation as authorial witness of his times. This break is premised on the experience of kairos, a form of time that was derived from Baldwin’s experience of Pentecostalism. Through John Grimes’s experience, Baldwin represents a break with the past that begins with the kairotic moment and progresses through the beginnings of self-love and the possibility of freedom enabled by this love. This essay contributes a new perspective on discussions of Baldwin’s representation of time and his relationship to Christianity.

James Baldwin Review
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Cognition as recognition
James Simpson

14 Textual face: cognition as recognition James Simpson When university presidents defend the humanities, they do so in the same way they defend the sciences: as discovery of knowledge. That may be true of the sciences, but in this short chapter I want to persuade you that there is a distinctive form of thinking in the humanities. Thinking in the humanities is more a matter of recovery than discovery. Moments of revelation in the humanities are more inventions in the older sense (finding the already known) than scientific inventions in the newer sense

in Contemporary Chaucer across the centuries
Christina and Maria Francesca Rossetti’s Dante sisterhood
Federica Coluzzi

. Writing across a wide spectrum of genres, printed media and topics, their works ensured the continued reception and canonisation of Dante in high and popular British culture, often achieving critical recognition and success of sales. Thus far, the memory of their achievements has fallen prey to the gendered mechanism of historicisation perceptively unpacked by Dale Spender: When we are presented with an exclusively male

in Dante beyond influence
Essays for Stephanie Trigg

For 700 years, Geoffrey Chaucer has spoken to scholars and amateurs alike. How does his work speak to us in the twenty-first century? This volume provides a unique vantage point for responding to this question, furnished by the pioneering scholar of medieval literary studies, Stephanie Trigg: the symptomatic long history. While Trigg's signature methodological framework acts as a springboard for the vibrant conversation that characterises this collection, each chapter offers an inspiring extension of her scholarly insights. The varied perspectives of the outstanding contributors attest to the vibrancy and the advancement of debates in Chaucer studies: thus, formerly rigid demarcations surrounding medieval literary studies, particularly those concerned with Chaucer, yield in these essays to a fluid interplay between Chaucer within his medieval context; medievalism and ‘reception’; the rigours of scholarly research and the recognition of amateur engagement with the past; the significance of the history of emotions; and the relationship of textuality with subjectivity according to their social and ecological context. Each chapter produces a distinctive and often startling interpretation of Chaucer that broadens our understanding of the dynamic relationship between the medieval past and its ongoing re-evaluation. The inventive strategies and methodologies employed in this volume by leading thinkers in medieval literary criticism will stimulate exciting and timely insights for researchers and students of Chaucer, medievalism, medieval studies, and the history of emotions, especially those interested in the relationship between medieval literature, the intervening centuries and contemporary cultural change.

Annalisa Oboe and Elisa Bordin

fields and is the first book-length overview of Abani’s prose production, also including intertextual references to his essays and poetry. So far criticism has mainly focused on Abani’s fiction rather than his poetry, despite the important awards that collections such as Kalakuta Republic have won. As regards bibliographical records on Abani’s complete literary production, Daria Tunca’s website The Chris Abani Bibliography 1 deserves recognition and appreciation: it contains the most updated and complete bibliography on

in Chris Abani
Annalisa Oboe and Elisa Bordin

, whose difference from his father, and his closeness to his mother, elicits violence and a severe process of re-education. Slow violence within the family, Barnwell says, can take the forms of shaming, silencing, ostracising, withholding recognition, and effectively erasing memories and relationships. All of these forms are present in Abani’s writings. While revealing his own family secrets, fighting silence, and facing shame, he makes public a slower set of ramifications of violence through which ‘we can keep track of

in Chris Abani
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Dante studies in Victorian Britain
Federica Coluzzi

which the British contribution to Dante studies, uniquely, received official recognition. During these and the following decades, Barlow’s network of scholarly correspondence and contacts grew exponentially with ‘some 320 letters from upwards 100 correspondents, many of them notable figures in the history of Dante studies: Ashburham, Boehmer, Emiliani Giudici, Kirkup, Laicata, Norton, the two Lord Vernon and Witte’ (Lindon, 1988 : 54). The

in Dante beyond influence
Enacting feminine alterity in Marilynne Robinson’s Housekeeping
Makayla C. Steiner

subjectivity’ (138). Nor is it simply, as Martha Ravits claims, ‘an “enduring recognition of the mother-daughter passion” – and the endless consequences of its disruption’ (647). Above all, Housekeeping is a meditation on the loneliness and isolation attendant to the fracturing of a family. While not directly mentioned in the novel, feminine alterity is clearly at work in the efforts of Sylvia Foster, and later her daughter Sylvie, to make home a place of refuge and asylum for the children orphaned as a result of unexpected death, suicide, and abandonment

in Marilynne Robinson
Annalisa Oboe and Elisa Bordin

could not be clearer. Derek sees Abigail, and in this seeing she gains an acceptance that she cherishes and labels as love. In Precarious Life (2004) Judith Butler points out that the request for recognition is part of an ongoing process of fashioning the self: When we recognize another, or when we ask for recognition for ourselves, we are not asking for an Other to see us as we are, as we already are, as we have always been, as we were constituted prior to the encounter itself. Instead, in

in Chris Abani
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A critical conversation

acknowledgement/recognition theme sounded in 1st Corinthians 13:12: For now we see through a glass, darkly; but then face to face: now I know in part; but then shall I know even as also I am known (King James Version). This emphasis upon the face can also be found in the thought of Emmanuel Levinas and runs counter to Jean-Paul Sartre's assumption that the ‘gaze’ of the other turns us into a thing, an ‘it’ not a ‘thou

in Marilynne Robinson