Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 66 items for :

  • "recognition" x
  • Manchester Medieval Sources x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
E.A. Jones

Church, in the person of Archbishop William Melton, stepped in. It is understandable that Melton chose not to give recognition or further publicity to Staunton’s teachings by recording them in his register – but frustrating for those of us left intrigued as to what they might have contained. Translated from the Latin in The Register of William Melton, Archbishop of York 1317–1340: Volume III , edited by

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
Abstract only
C. E. Beneš

the Lombard League, the Genoese more or less successfully resisted efforts by Charlemagne's German heirs to re-establish imperial sovereignty in Italy. 37 The emperors often had to content themselves with official—but functionally meaningless—recognition of their suzerainty. A major complicating factor was the contemporary conflict between the empire and the papacy: at the same time that emperors such as Frederick I Barbarossa (r

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
Abstract only
Gervase Rosser

‘the assent of the commonalty’, and later at Coventry where the weavers protested at the fixing of taxes by the elite [ 91 ]. 7 In return for recognition of its right to rule, the town council undertook in the first place to guarantee the safety and security of the urban population, and beyond this to promote its economic interests. These policies were pursued both through

in Towns in medieval England
Abstract only
Gervase Rosser

if the tenants shall desire to give or to sell their tenement to any secular person, they shall do this freely: in such fashion, however, that the seller shall give us 2 d , and the buyer 4 d , in recognition of our lordship. But the tenants shall have free choice as to who should do fealty* [for the land] to both themselves and us. And if anyone shall forfeit that land, or be sued by another [over

in Towns in medieval England
Gervase Rosser

Medieval Latin from British Sources , ed. R. E. Latham, Oxford, 1975–2013, s.v. ‘perturbare’, 1 b, c. On the medieval incidence of insanity and its recognition as a mitigating circumstance in criminal trials, see N. D. Hurnard, The King’s Pardon for Homicide before A.D. 1307 , Oxford, 1969, pp. 159–70; W. J. Turner, Care and Custody of the Mentally Ill, Incompetent

in Towns in medieval England
Rachel Stone and Charles West

of things not seen” [Hebrews 11:1], it is clear that faith is the evidence for those things which are not able to appear. For those things which appear no longer involve faith, but recognition. But these works of our Redeemer which in themselves cannot be comprehended should be considered in the light of other works of his, so that

in The divorce of King Lothar and Queen Theutberga
Abstract only
Michael Staunton

wanted to write about Thomas. After all, his cult had gained popular and official recognition in a remarkably short time, before most of the Lives were even written, thereby removing one of the most common purposes of hagiography: the establishment of the subject’s sanctity. One of the driving forces was obviously the widespread interest in the subject, affording a ready audience. But another powerful

in The lives of Thomas Becket
Anthony Musson and Edward Powell

imply or involve corruption. 10 [ 7.2 ] The fee paid was usually a retainer or a courtesy gift – in case the litigant had need of specialised advice, or in recognition of general service. It should not be (though it inevitably was) construed simply as a bribe to show especial favour or bend the rules. 11 Yet the targeting of royal justices during the Peasants’ Revolt revealed a lack of public esteem for

in Crime, Law and Society in the Later Middle Ages
Anthony Musson and Edward Powell

business in the form of trespass litigation. Recognition of trespass as a matter of interest to the crown considerably enlarged the scope of royal criminal jurisdiction as many matters previously remedied in the local courts could now come before the eyre justices. 5 Although minor offences and wrongs continued to be remedied in local courts, such an expansion in the business undertaken by the eyre

in Crime, Law and Society in the Later Middle Ages
Samuel K. Cohn, Jr

petition does it specify the consequences of the failed revolt of the Eight of Santa Maria Novella at the end of August – the outlawing of the third revolutionary guild, that was variously called of the carders, the Ciompi, or Popolo di Dio , and their prohibition to join any other guild or have guild or citizenship recognition. On behalf of the councillors of the two newly created guilds described below

in Popular protest in late-medieval Europe