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Barrie Gunter

-faceted. There are cognitive, emotional, social, cultural, and physical components. A child’s ability to process and store information, to interpret their experiences, to relate to other people, and to cope with physical changes that occur as they grow up all come into play at different times and mediate their reactions to brands (Young, 1990; Gunter et al., 2005; McAlister & Cornwell, 2010). It is important for brand marketers, regulators, consumers, and those of us who conduct research into children’s consumerism to understand the nature of these processes and how they work

in Kids and branding in a digital world
Joe McGrath

6 The new architecture of enforcement Introduction The contemporary architecture of enforcement is significantly different from the traditional architecture that preceded it. From the 1990s, the conventional crime monopoly on corporate deviancy became fragmented. Specialist, interdisciplinary agencies with enhanced powers policed and prosecuted wrongdoing. Furthermore, the exclusive dominance of conventional criminal law faded. Regulators increasingly relied on regulatory criminal law, administrative fines and civil orders to sanction companies and their

in Corporate and white-collar crime in Ireland
Joe McGrath

sentencing is being redrawn, they may indicate the beginning of a new culture, one which is more willing to recognise the harm posed by corporate wrongdoing and punish it accordingly. Compliance and sanctioning models of corporate regulation Regulatory agencies like the ODCE have adopted a highly sophisticated, graduated approach to wrongdoing (Appleby, 2010). This model corresponds approximately to the responsive regulatory model advanced by Ayres and Braithwaite (1992) (see Figure 7.1). According to this model, regulators first attempt to educate and persuade people to

in Corporate and white-collar crime in Ireland
Abstract only
Author: David Whyte

This book explains the direct link between the structure of the corporation and its limitless capacity for ecological destruction. It argues that we need to find the most effective means of ending the corporation’s death grip over us. The corporation is a problem, not merely because it devours natural resources, pollutes and accelerates the carbon economy. As this book argues, the constitutional structure of the corporation eradicates the possibility that we can put the protection of the planet before profit. A fight to get rid of the corporations that have brought us to this point may seem an impossible task at the moment, but it is necessary for our survival. It is hardly radical to suggest that if something is killing us, we should over-power it and make it stop. We need to kill the corporation before it kills us.

State, market, and the Party in China’s financial reform
Author: Julian Gruin

Over more than thirty years of reform and opening, the Chinese Communist Party has pursued the gradual marketization of China’s economy alongside the preservation of a resiliently authoritarian political system, defying long-standing predictions that ‘transition’ to a market economy would catalyse deeper political transformation. In an era of deepening synergy between authoritarian politics and finance capitalism, Communists constructing capitalism offers a novel and important perspective on this central dilemma of contemporary Chinese development. This book challenges existing state–market paradigms of political economy and reveals the Eurocentric assumptions of liberal scepticism towards Chinese authoritarian resilience. It works with an alternative conceptual vocabulary for analysing the political economy of financial development as both the management and exploitation of socio-economic uncertainty. Drawing upon extensive fieldwork and over sixty interviews with policymakers, bankers, and former party and state officials, the book delves into the role of China’s state-owned banking system since 1989. It shows how political control over capital has been central to China’s experience of capitalist development, enabling both rapid economic growth whilst preserving macroeconomic and political stability. Communists constructing capitalism will be of academic interest to scholars and graduate students in the fields of Chinese studies, social studies of finance, and international and comparative political economy. Beyond academia, it will be essential reading for anyone interested in the evolution of Chinese capitalism and its implications for an increasingly central issue in contemporary global politics: the financial foundations of illiberal capitalism.

Abstract only
Barrie Gunter

marketing forms. This requires a new form of learning and that is in part what this book makes reference to.  In addition, the regulators of marketing as well as advertisers themselves have duties of responsibility in this context. There are comprehensive mandatory regulations and codes of practices drawn up and implemented by advertising regulators, and others voluntarily developed by different industry trade bodies and by some large corporations. Often the latter reflect the mandated codes. The important point here is that the regulators and their codes have not kept

in Kids and branding in a digital world
Abstract only
Joe McGrath

enforcement in Ireland was sanctioning in theory and non-existent in practice. Since then, enforcement has diversified, employing both compliance-orientated and sanctioning approaches. Enforcers first educated companies and their officers about their legal obligations and encouraged compliance with the law. If the law was broken, enforcers required offenders to remedy their non-compliance. In general, companies and their officers were only sanctioned when they refused to obey the law or refused to remediate their wrongdoing. In these circumstances, regulators were supposed

in Corporate and white-collar crime in Ireland
Friends or foes?
Roberto Baldoli and Claudio M. Radaelli

and more generally evidence-based approaches to decision-making establish both rights and obligations: obligations for the regulators or lawmakers, and rights for those affected groups, professions and citizens who want to make their voices heard, and have the right to know about the empirical foundations of a regulatory proposal. The normative stance (i.e. what ought to happen, not necessarily what happens) of impact assessment is the following: in the absence of evidence and the possibility of discussing and criticising it, there is no social authorisation for

in The freedom of scientific research
Causal factors stimulating change
Joe McGrath

large fundraisers at prominent social events such as the ‘Galway Races’ where businessmen were allowed to buy access to the Taoiseach and other powerful politicians, presumably with a view to influencing policy (Irish Times, 13 April 2011: 14). Businessmen funded the personal lifestyles of senior politicians and in return were given the inside track on securing government contracts and other favours. There was also a complete lack of separation between regulators and big business. The remainder of this section analyses how a culture of corruption and cronyism became

in Corporate and white-collar crime in Ireland
David Whyte

regulator’s work. As well as being responsible for controlling pollution and ensuring air and water quality is protected, the UK Environment Agency also issues 14,000 pollution 109 WHYTE 9781526146984 PRINT.indd 109 29/06/2020 14:40 Ecocide licences every year. The holders of those licences are permitted to produce waste, or to discharge substances into the air or into waterways.5 In liberal democracies like the UK, even the most deadly forms of pollutant are produced under the conditions of a licence granted by a regulatory authority. For example, the Innospec plant

in Ecocide