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David M. Bergeron

also stood at political and cultural crossroads. James had just finished his first ten years of English rule, and the events of 1613 changed the political and personal dynamic in the royal family and court forever. Further, no subsequent year in the Jacobean period equalled the moments of cultural brilliance of this year. The burning of the Globe on 29 June marked an ending and a

in Shakespeare’s London 1613
David M. Bergeron

settled on Frederick as being suitable, to the chagrin of Queen Anne but with the support of Henry, who longed for such a stalwart Protestant to marry into the Stuart royal family. In the negotiations, James offered a dowry of £40,000, and an allowance; the Germans responded with an offer of £1,500 per annum for Elizabeth, and provided for the princess’s retinue of thirty-six men and thirteen women. ‘If

in Shakespeare’s London 1613
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David M. Bergeron

arrangements in the Great Hall, the royal chapel, and the somewhat new Banqueting House. He moved silently and sometimes noisily through this space certain that he and the royal family were approaching a monumental occasion of things new-born. According to John Chamberlain in a letter of 11 February, the authorities had already spent £6,000 for the planned fireworks and sea fights for

in Shakespeare’s London 1613
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James Doelman

fashion. I have considered those on Prince Frederick Henry of the Palatine (whom the elegies treated largely through his connection with the British royal family). Of the others, by far the greatest number were on the Protestant hero King Gustavus Adolphus, who died in 1632 at the height of his military success. At least forty-one English poems lamenting his death survive, a number surpassed only by those on Prince Henry. However

in The daring muse of the early Stuart funeral elegy
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David M. Bergeron

royal patron, the sponsor of the King’s Men. The family of history becomes in the drama the family of art only in turn to become the current family of history. The play’s Prologue says: ‘Think ye see / The very persons of our noble story / As they were living’ (25–7). But spectators at the Globe understood the living royal persons as part of the noble story. The Stuart royal family pervades their

in Shakespeare’s London 1613
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The Jacobean writing of Britain
Christopher Ivic

what ‘we see when we open The Theater … is not the king but the country’. 26 Perhaps because Helgerson is less interested in the wider British-Irish framework of the Theatre , he neglects to mention that Speed’s map of Scotland includes in its margins, what Speed terms the maps’ ‘ Emblematicall compartments ’, members of the royal family: King James, Queen Anne, Prince Henry and Prince Charles. And it is an archipelagic royal family that we see: written below the images of the four figures is ‘James King of Great Britain, Fraunce & Ireland’, ‘Queen Anna of Great

in The subject of Britain, 1603–25
David M. Bergeron

; Lennox in fact served as one of Mary’s godparents. No comparable religious ceremony had occurred in the Stuart royal family since the opulence of Henry’s baptism in 1594. The chapel at Greenwich shimmered with jewels and a stately font of silver and gold. James’s possible dream of this daughter supplanting his mother’s memory shattered, however, with Mary’s unexpected death on 16 September 1607. 12 This

in Shakespeare’s London 1613
Drama’s solace
David M. Bergeron

on 27 April, Lady Elizabeth’s Men received a royal patent. Prince Henry’s Men became Elector Palatine’s Men or Palsgrave’s Men after Henry’s death. The royal family thus developed a far-reaching apparatus for support of drama. These acting companies performed in various public theatre buildings in greater London and at court. The King’s Men also began to perform in the private theatre known as

in Shakespeare’s London 1613
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David M. Bergeron

[Parliament’s] help; he did not want to press them in this matter, but only to ask for the aid they could give him without discomfort’ (9). He saw it as the country’s obligation to support the royal family financially as subjects have traditionally supported their king. James gingerly avoided at this point the troublesome matter of ‘impositions’. That would come later. In another contemporary source, James

in Shakespeare’s London 1613
Stephen Orgel

our capacity for suffering, about the fact that however bad things are, they can always be worse. To Jacobean audiences, however, the play would have said something deeply admonitory about hierarchy and history: that ignoring the patriarchal imperatives – whether in the royal family or in any other – brought chaos to the kingdom, abolished the line of succession; indeed

in Spectacular Performances