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Daniel Szechi

carefully holding one’s glass over a bowl of water (i.e. drinking the health of the king over the water – a.k.a. King James) only looks quaint to modern eyes. Likewise the wearing of tartan waistcoats in the late 1740s, hanging unlabelled portraits of the exiled Stuart royal family in their country houses, and penning and reading poetry evoking the good old days of lost (Stuart) innocence. Thus when rebellious angels fell, The very heav’n, where good ones dwell, Became th’apostate spirits’ hell. Seeking against eternal right

in The Jacobites (second edition)
Abstract only
Daniel Szechi

Joseph Enzer and Thomas Clayton in a style and with motifs that contemporaries well understood to be thoroughly Jacobite. Architects and designers like Enzer, Clayton and James Gibb accordingly developed a special style for a select market of Jacobite clients. 58 More discreet, or less wealthy, patrician Jacobites made do with having pictures of Jacobite and Cavalier martyrs hanging on the walls of their homes and keeping medallions celebrating the exiled royal family. Accordingly a pool of Jacobite limners, engravers and medal manufacturers developed. 59 Jacobites

in The Jacobites (second edition)
Daniel Szechi

party’s hard-won victory therefore had huge consequences for the Jacobite cause. In essence it committed the Jacobites to a constitutional settlement in the event of a restoration that would, de facto , have been as emphatically Protestant as the developing Revolution Settlement in England ( see document 3 ). Naturally enough, James II and VII’s Catholic co-religionists bitterly opposed his making commitments that threatened to leave them little better off after a Jacobite restoration than they were under William III and II. And the royal family, mindful of the

in The Jacobites (second edition)
Abstract only
Daniel Szechi

Jacobite experience has only begun to be explored by scholars such as John Toffee, Kathryn King and Claire Walker; there is a great deal more to do and it will without doubt transform our understanding of Jacobitism as a whole. 31 By contrast, since the heyday of the Jacobite movement there has always been a good deal of interest in its material culture. Commemorative Jacobite medals, pictures of the royal family and various Jacobite heroes, locks of Charles Edward’s hair and memorabilia associated with the Jacobite risings were just a few of the

in The Jacobites (second edition)
Daniel Szechi

the Hanoverian royal family and whisking them off to confinement in France, or else holding them hostage until reinforcements arrived. Alexander Murray of Elibank, 115 the main liaison between Charles and the plotters (from which the conspiracy derived the name by which it is usually known: the ‘Elibank plot’), finally killed it at the English end when he realised that there was no hope of Prussian or French aid and that the English Jacobites were being manoeuvred into going it alone. 116 By then, however, Charles had already sent two trusted agents from the

in The Jacobites (second edition)
Daniel Szechi

the stock market. Patricians throughout the British Isles, and even only mildly prosperous merchants and shopkeepers, were soon borrowing money wherever they could find it in order to buy shares, on the assumption that there would be no end to the rise in the South Sea Company’s share price. 93 To keep the Whig regime sweet the company directors also had no compunction about awarding what were effectively free shares to the royal family, government ministers and well-connected courtiers. They could then sell these at a vast profit as the speculative frenzy roared

in The Jacobites (second edition)
Silvia Salvatici

the Prussian Red Cross (Centralkomitee des Preußischen Vereins zur Pflege im Felde verwundeter und erkrankter Krieger) and the French society (Société de Secours aux Blessés Militaires des Armées de Terre et de Mer) turned out to be particularly important. In the Kingdom of Prussia the question of assistance for sick or wounded soldiers had from the very beginning received careful consideration from the government and especially from the royal family. As well as this, the war with Austria in 1866 had been an important testing ground for the volunteers

in A history of humanitarianism, 1755–1989
Zheng Yangwen

name and a platform, making him the symbol of a cause and attracting more and more overseas Chinese people, especially students. He often lived in exile, as he was wanted by the Qing. He spoke at many places, including Oxford in January 1896. Below is part of his speech: In ancient times in China, people had the right to talk about public affairs, that is why the country enjoyed prosperity and had plenty. At that time, the crown was not hereditary; it was often transferred from a prince who was not qualified to outstanding people outside the royal family

in Ten Lessons in Modern Chinese History
A guide for students
Stephen Mossman

Foucauldian bio-power, where membership of the regime was synonymous with membership of the royal family. Yet not all early medieval governmentality was ‘statist’. McCarthy’s chapter on the German-speaking lands under Ottonian rule explores a form of social organization in which government was so decentred as to be performed without anything recognizable, even in early medieval terms, as a state. It is medieval Germany above all that puts the lie to the idea that there is anything normative or necessary to the concentration of authority in a strong central government

in Debating medieval Europe
The Christian kingdoms and al-Andalus
Charles Insley

. There is some evidence that important aristocrats were charged with assisting the king in bringing to justice those who had become, in the colourful idiom of the sources, ‘puffed up with pride and driven by malice’, a sorry state that led these misguided souls to challenge royal authority. 75 The Galician aristocracy, parts of which were extremely closely tied to the royal family, helped in this ‘mopping up’ process, notably so as early as the 870s, when a certain Hermenegild helped Alfonso III to convince Duke Witiza of the error of his ways. 76 This same family

in Debating medieval Europe