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In search of Manly Banister, an excerpt from an unpublishable memoir
R.L. Tillman

suppose it's unlikely that I will ever know much more, and I'm not sure that I would care to. In my imagination, the man has assumed a mythic stature proportionate to his name. Banister had a wide-ranging career as a writer, driven by an amateur's interest in art, science fiction, and mechanical tinkering. He had been a fireman, a Marine on Okinawa

in Perspectives on contemporary printmaking
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World politics and popular culture
Jack Holland

among the first to take seriously the importance of Star Trek , a show which has garnered relatively sustained attention in IR. 45 Indeed, where film and television have been studied within IR, science fiction has tended to feature more prominently than other genres. 46 That having been said, Harry Potter and, particularly, zombies have also attracted significant and sustained critical enquiry, alongside other popular cultural media, such as comedy, cartoons, and Tom Clancy novels. 47 At times, however, analysis of film and television in IR has focused on their

in Fictional television and American Politics
Jack Holland

Social Science-Fiction?’, Sociology , 45:1 (2011), 152. 7 C. Brooker, ‘Oh, just watch it …’, Guardian (21 July 2007 ). 8 David Simon, quoted in J. Pearson and A. Andrews, ‘David Simon’, Vice (2 December 2009 ). 9 C. Bigsby, Viewing America (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2013 ), p. 219. 10 Wilde, ‘Why The Wire is the Greatest TV Show Ever Made’. 11 Busfield and Owen (eds), The Wire Re-Up ; ‘University of York offers degree course on The Wire’, Telegraph (16 May 2010 ); J. Swansburg, ‘More college courses on HBO’s The Wire

in Fictional television and American Politics
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Steven Earnshaw

that we live in the real world, and in our everyday lives we judge things against what is ‘real’ all the time, only rarely stepping back to question this process. The ‘real’ is our ‘default’ position: fantasy, science fiction, unreal, implausible, surreal, gothic, nonsense – all these terms only work because they imply a relation to what we know to be real or true. Our judgement and attitude to what is real is, in the first instance, therefore mainly intuitive – we have a feel for what is real, and so we recognise instantly if something accords with what we believe

in Beginning realism
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Art in the distributed field and systems of production
Johanna Drucker

intervention, rather than as a thing. The science-fiction inspired imagination of the NET research project led to the realisation of an actual, integrated, hybrid work. Our cultural imaginary is infused with technophilic musings and aesthetic potentialities. We absorb our ideas of future interface from special effects in films that also offer a vision of space-time transformations

in Perspectives on contemporary printmaking
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Clare Wilkinson and Emma Weitkamp

boundaries between popular and professional publication became far more disciplined (Knight, 2006 ). Researchers were now being called upon to have other skills, including a greater propensity for working collaboratively amongst colleagues and to generate funding as research became more and more expensive (Knight, 2006 ), restricting opportunities for wider public pursuits. As professional publications became more specialised, other mediatory writing styles began to emerge, for example science fiction (Knight, 2006 ). Beyond fiction, specialisation called on authors to

in Creative research communication
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Paying attention – environmental justice and ecocritical art history
Andrew Patrizio

, thrives on crossbreeding, grows better from being stepped on.’ 26 This is Ursula Le Guin in her anarcho-science fiction novel The Dispossessed . It is not a bad concluding epigraph for The ecological eye , as an expression of my hopes (and expectations). This book has tried to make an appeal to a quite extreme form of collective and egalitarian sensibility, rather than one of hierarchy and exclusion. This has meant radically limiting the support (and indeed the criticism) towards any one single methodological, ethical or disciplinary approach. This is not to imply

in The ecological eye
Steven Earnshaw

and the beginning of the nineteenth, and Scott’s historical novels, offer other dimensions which the Realist novel genre is free to draw on. Such a narrative privileges the Realist novel as the full realisation of a genre that had previously existed in embryo form, such that ‘novel’ becomes synonymous with ‘Realist novel’ unless otherwise specified by sub-genres such as crime novel, science-fiction, gothic or postmodern, for example. There are various objections to this. The very term ‘novel’ as described in this way is open to criticism since some of those

in Beginning realism
Peter Barry

recognises that evolution itself is a force which has ‘non-human agency’, and will surely proceed beyond us into a posthuman, post-anthropocentric future that we may be part of, but could only be part of . The most obvious application of this material and outlook in literary studies is to works of science fiction, cyberpunk, and steampunk fiction, which are, of course, genres defined by their preoccupation with this kind of material and outlook. It is also directly relevant to other genres, such as ghost stories, where consciousness, awareness, aversions, and desires

in Beginning theory (fourth edition)
Steven Earnshaw

to become handmaids, with the sole purpose of giving offspring to childless couples. The protagonist is Offred. Although there is obviously nothing here which might form the basis of the realist novel, part of the thrust of postmodernism is that realism simply is not possible, so in some ways it makes little sense in any case to rework typical realist materials in a postmodern manner, as the modernists often did. While it could be argued that the use of the science-fiction genre makes for a poor comparison with the realist genre, it is in accord with postmodern

in Beginning realism