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Stephen Penn

Wyclif devoted many years of his life to the intensive study of Scripture, beginning formally with exegetical lectures that survive as a sequence of postils (probably written between 1371 and 1376), now collectively known as Postils on the Whole of the Bible , a unique and extensive commentary that won Wyclif considerable respect as an exegete. 1 In these, we witness his meticulous defence of the authority of scripture, and of the literal veracity of all of its parts. This is developed further in On the Truth of Holy Scripture (1377

in John Wyclif
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Selected Latin works in translation
Author:

John Wyclif (d. 1384) was among the leading schoolmen of fourteenth-century Europe. He was an outspoken controversialist and critic of the church, and, in his last days at Oxford, the author of the greatest heresy that England had known. This volume offers translations of a representative selection of his Latin writings on theology, the church and the Christian life. It offers a comprehensive view of the life of this charismatic but irascible medieval theologian, and of the development of the most prominent dissenting mind in pre-Reformation England. This collection will be of interest to undergraduate and graduate students of medieval history, historical theology and religious heresy, as well as scholars in the field.

Wendy R. Childs
and
Phillipp R. Schofield

would not have been deprived of his strength nor the other of his wisdom. Perhaps a hidden cause, not immediate but in the past, brought punishment upon the earl. The Earl of Lancaster once cut off Piers Gaveston’s head, and now by the king’s command the Earl of Lancaster has lost his head. Thus, perhaps not unjustly, the earl received like for like, as it is written in Holy Scripture: ‘for with the

in The reign of Edward II, 1307–27
Stephen Penn

earliest and its most powerful expression. In Eradicating Errors Concerning Universals in General , he offers a defence of his metaphysical system and answers common objections to his stance on universals ( 1 ). It was not until he composed his definitive treatise on the topic shortly afterwards, however, that he offered a formal typology of universals ( 2 ). Despite its apparent simplicity, this five-part scheme would prove to play a fundamental role in Wyclif’s metaphysical system, and is also partially replicated in his fivefold conception of Scripture ( 7i

in John Wyclif
Abstract only
Stephen Penn

the Lord actually was the consecrated host. Correspondingly, I say that if this sleepy individual knew that the sick man who believed that he had sensed the dominical body in the way described was trustworthy, which cannot be proved experimentally or through Scripture, then he was not then therefore a saint, but, like too many people, a manifest idolater from Antichrist’s cult of signs. The people could actually be led astray so that they worshipped moles and bats, and creatures still more abominable, as God. In respect of the

in John Wyclif
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C. E. Beneš

Here begins the chronicle of the city of Genoa. By the wisdom of the Gospel we are instructed not to hide beneath laziness or idleness that talent of intelligence which is entrusted to us by God; rather, let us return to God the profit of interest multiplied, presenting it at the table of the Holy Scriptures. 1 For the Lord rewards those who multiply their talents, but

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
C. E. Beneš

ought to hate all avarice and cupidity. Chapter one: That rulers ought to be powerful and magnanimous so that they can govern without fear. Sacred Scripture is the queen of all the sciences: the other sciences attend upon her as servants and footmen, so every science is justified insofar as it follows in the footsteps of Sacred Scripture herself. She is also the instructor ( magistra ) of all

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
E.A. Jones

deeply with the theological doctrines of Holy Scripture than with the study of physical and secular science. In his nineteenth year, considering the uncertain term of human life, and the fearful end especially before the fleshly and the worldly, he took thought, by the inspiration of God, providently concerning himself (remembering his end), lest he should be taken in the snares of sin. Therefore, when he had returned from

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
C. E. Beneš

Furthermore, we may corroborate this principle which we have just affirmed with the testimony of Sacred Scripture, for it is stated in Ecclesiasticus that harmony among the good is good: With three things my spirit is well pleased , which are commended by God and men: harmony between brothers , the love of neighbours , and a man and a woman that agree well together . 16 It is pleasing to God and men when

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
E.A. Jones

in the city of York. 12 Cf. 2 Cor. 3:6, ‘For the letter killeth, but the spirit quickeneth’ – a popular proof-text for advocates of the advanced allegorical reading of scripture. 13 That is, the devil. 14

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550