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Temporal origami in the Towneley Herod the Great
Daisy Black

episodes where Herod commands his men to search their books ‘for any thing / If ye find of sich a kyng’. 6 This gives the past a textual nature which has the ability both to threaten and to inform present action, as Herod’s councillors scour the pages of scripture to guide the king’s actions. Unlike the other dramatic personae discussed so far, Herod actively reads time as the product of ‘bookys’, and thus as malleable as the vellum on which his strikingly medieval library was written. This figuring of time as textual construct places a greater emphasis on the

in Play time
Exploring tensions between the secular and the sacred in Noah, the ‘least biblical biblical movie ever’
Becky Bartlett

Conservative commentators have long criticised the film industry’s alleged negative representations or outright rejection of religion, accusing Hollywood of promoting its own secular, liberal ideology regardless of the wishes of a predominantly faith-orientated audience. Within academia the study of religion and film is an emerging area of interest, one that remains dominated by writers working in the fields of theology, biblical studies and religious studies. Why is this? To what extent can secularisation theory be used as a way of understanding the historical lack of involvement of film studies scholars in the field? How might the controversy surrounding Noah’s perceived ‘atheist’ adaptation be used as a way of understanding broader tensions between religious and non-religious elements in Hollywood and the academy? Through analysis of the controversy surrounding the interpretation and adaptation of scripture in Noah, this chapter reflects on the position of film studies scholarship in the emerging and developing multidisciplinary field of religion and film.

in The Bible onscreen in the new millennium
The Christian critical reception of elliptical Jesus narratives
Wickham Clayton

perform miracles. Nowhere in the Bible do any of the events from the narrative appear, which suggests strict fidelity to the scriptures is not necessary, if a potential concern. In adaptation studies, writers such as Linda Hutcheon ( 2006 ) and Thomas Leitch ( 2007 ) move away from fidelity as a way of determining the value of an adaptation. Hutcheon argues that ‘there are many and varied motives behind adaptation and few involve faithfulness’ (xiii). Leitch asserts that his methodology ‘treat(s) fidelity as a problem variously conceived and defined by the filmmakers

in The Bible onscreen in the new millennium
Queering time, place, and faith in the diasporic novels of Rabih Alameddine
Alberto Fernández Carbajal

into the Druze faith is not compulsory, and that Druze religious scriptures are traditionally only made available to those formally incepted into the community of believers, it is little wonder that, as Halabi Abbas suggests, contemporary Druze, especially those in the diaspora, often adopt secularist or Westernised cosmologies. This seems to be certainly the case with Alameddine, who has relinquished faith and embraced instead a postmodern canon of ‘world literature’ including the literary experiments of Jorge Luis Borges, Roland Barthes, Fernando Pessoa, and Javier

in Queer Muslim diasporas in contemporary literature and film
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Thinking across
Alberto Fernández Carbajal

and undertakes irreverent queer exegeses debunking ossified heteronormative interpretation of religious scripture, offering the person living with AIDS as a pseudo-prophetic figure amalgamating places and histories against the dominance of Western logic. Finally, the work of Randa Jarrar drew our attention to the persistent heteropatriarchal biases of diasporic Muslim communities, even when male figures attempt to distance themselves from Arab patriarchal values. Jarrar’s work undertakes a reclamation of the queer female body in its own terms, liberated from the

in Queer Muslim diasporas in contemporary literature and film
Social contexts in L’Inchiesta and Risen
Fernando Gabriel Pagnoni Berns and Emiliano Aguilar

, the ‘long history of biblical interpretation is an eloquent testimony to scripture’s capacity to mean different things at different times’ (Burnette-Bletsch 2016 : 1–2). Both Risen and L’Inchiesta , sharing similar plots, articulate and negotiate the relationship between different social and cultural contexts and the enduring importance of sacred scriptures. References Aaron , Michele ( 2014 ) Death and the Moving Image , Edinburgh : Edinburgh University Press . Armstrong , Karen ( 2003 ) ‘ Seeing Things as They Really Are ’ in Langford , James

in The Bible onscreen in the new millennium
Hollywood, Christians and the American Culture Wars
Karen Patricia Heath

consistently portrayed in a negative light or without nuance in mainstream films. As Adele Reinhartz has noted, ‘whether we are aware of it or not, we encounter scripture in almost every film we view’ ( 2013 : 2). Even summer blockbusters such as Simon West’s Con Air ( 1997 ) appealed to some viewers of faith, as audience comments such as ‘Nicolas Cage plays a wonderfully moral character’ and ‘there were wonderful flashes of light and truth’ on the online portal ChristianAnswers.net indicate ( n.d. ). If Culture Wars rocked American society at century’s end, it was never

in The Bible onscreen in the new millennium
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Brian McFarlane

just the restraint implied by the cliché. The psychiatrist obsessed with his wife’s death in Sebastian Barry’s novel, The Secret Scripture , writes in his ‘Commonplace Book’: ‘Every day I feel compelled to go up to her room, often I hurry, as if there is an urgency, like at the end of that old film, Brief Encounter . As if, should I delay, she would not be there. As indeed she may not.’ 12 Robert Harris’s novel, The Ghost , makes passing reference to the film title during an episode in which a bomb has gone off

in The never-ending Brief Encounter
Unveiling American Muslim women in Rolla Selbak’s Three Veils (2011)
Alberto Fernández Carbajal

frames rape as a ‘crime’, not as a sin, which demonstrates a granulated knowledge of Islam that takes into consideration not just religious scripture and doctrine, but the attendant traditions of the tafsir and the fiqh . The resolution of Leila’s story may seem at once orthodox and optimistic: she ends up marrying another Muslim, albeit a Maghrebi, and the picture-perfect framing of her family life, including a little baby purposefully called Jamal, is not mindful enough of the trauma of sexual violence. In addition, this denouement is perhaps too naïvely hopeful

in Queer Muslim diasporas in contemporary literature and film
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A queer and cartographic exploration of the Palestinian diaspora in Randa Jarrar’s A Map of Home (2008) and Him, Me, Muhammad Ali (2016)
Alberto Fernández Carbajal

’s narrative has indeed offered us the family’s intimate histories of uprooting and diaspora. Here, Jarrar transposes the Qur’an’s concern with scripture and defamation to our modern concern with technology and surveillance, while reminding us of the necessity of recording histories in order to give textual embodiment to the dispossessed and the displaced, in this case the Palestinian diaspora. Self-conscious textuality and embodiment are intimately linked in Jarrar’s endeavours, which is in agreement with queer theory. In the introduction to

in Queer Muslim diasporas in contemporary literature and film