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From Galway to Cloyne and beyond

This book engages with the spectacular disenchantment with Catholicism in Ireland over the relatively short period of four decades. It begins with the visit of Pope John Paul II in 1979 and in particular his address to young people in Galway, where the crowd had been entertained beforehand by two of Ireland’s most celebrated clerics, Bishop Eamon Casey and Fr Michael Cleary, both of whom were engaged at the time in romantic affairs that resulted in the birth of children. It will be argued that the Pope’s visit was prompted by concern at the significant fall in vocations to priesthood and the religious life and the increasing secularism of Irish society.

The book then explores the various referenda that took place during the 1980s on divorce and abortion which, although they resulted in victories for the Church, demonstrated that their hold on the Irish public was weakening. The clerical abuse scandals of the 1990s were the tipping point for an Irish public which was generally resentful of the intrusive and repressive form of Catholicism that had been the norm in Ireland since the formation of the State in the 1920s.

Boasting an impressive array of contributors from various backgrounds and expertise, the essays in the book attempt to delineate the exact reasons for the progressive dismantling of the cultural legacy of Catholicism and the consequences this has had on Irish society. Among the contributors are Patricia Casey, Joe Cleary, Michael Cronin, Louise Fuller, Patsy McGarry, Vincent Twomey and Eamonn Wall.

Globalising kosher and halal markets
Authors: John Lever and Johan Fischer

Over the last two decades, global demand for kosher products has been growing steadily, and many non-religious consumers view kosher as a healthy food option: in the US over 60 per cent of kosher food consumption is linked to non-religious values associated with health and food quality. This book explores the emergence and expansion of global kosher and halal markets with a particular focus on the UK and Denmark. While Kosher is a Hebrew term meaning 'fit' or 'proper', halal is an Arabic word that literally means 'permissible' or 'lawful'. The book discusses the manufacture and production of kosher and halal meat (both red meat and poultry) with specific reference to audits/inspections, legislation, networking, product innovation and certification. It draws on contemporary empirical material to explore kosher and halal comparatively at different levels of the social scale, such as individual consumption, the marketplace, religious organisations and the state. It compares the major markets for kosher/halal in the UK with those in Denmark, where kosher/halal are important to smaller groups of religious consumers. Denmark plays an important role in biotechnology that is compatible with what we call kosher/halal transnational governmentality. The book explores how Jewish and Muslim consumers in the UK and Denmark understand and practice kosher consumption in their everyday lives. It also explores how 'compound practice' links eating with issues such as health and spirituality, for example, and with the influence of secularism and ritual.

Theology, politics, and Newtonian public science

This book explores at length the French and English Catholic literary revivals of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. These parallel but mostly independent movements include writers such as Charles Péguy, Paul Claudel, J. K. Huysmans, Gerard Manley Hopkins, G. K. Chesterton and Lionel Johnson. Rejecting critical approaches that tend to treat Catholic writings as exotic marginalia, the book makes extensive use of secularisation theory to confront these Catholic writings with the preoccupations of secularism and modernity. It compares individual and societal secularisation in France and England and examines how French and English Catholic writers understood and contested secular mores, ideologies and praxis, in the individual, societal and religious domains. The book also addresses the extent to which some Catholic writers succumbed to the seduction of secular instincts, even paradoxically in themes that are considered to be emblematic of Catholic literature. Its breadth will make it a useful guide for students wishing to become familiar with a wide range of such writings in France and England during this period.

Author: Brian Sudlow

This book is a comparative study of the French and English Catholic literary revivals of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. These parallel but mostly independent movements include writers such as Charles Péguy, Paul Claudel, J. K. Huysmans, Gerard Manley Hopkins, G. K. Chesterton and Lionel Johnson. Rejecting critical approaches that tend to treat Catholic writings as exotic marginalia, this book makes extensive use of secularisation theory to confront these Catholic writings with the preoccupations of secularism and modernity. It compares individual and societal secularisation in France and England and examines how French and English Catholic writers understood and contested secular mores, ideologies and praxis, in the individual, societal and religious domains. The book also addresses the extent to which some Catholic writers succumbed to the seduction of secular instincts, even paradoxically in themes which are considered to be emblematic of the Catholic literature.

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Laura Schwartz

themselves ‘infidels’ – reclaiming a title initially employed as a term of abuse by their Christian opponents. Such a name implied a refusal of faith and a betrayal of God’s law – acts which Freethinking feminists believed to be essential to ending the subjugation of their sex. 2 For them, religion, particularly Christianity, was the primary cause of women’s oppression. The question of ‘religion’ versus ‘secularism’ and which offers a

in Infidel feminism
Sarah Glynn

in later chapters. General Zia and the Islamic factor The rule of General – later President – Ziaur Rahman gave a new intensity, as well as an added complexity, to secular/religious tensions in Bangladesh and in the probashi community. It also further eroded the already much-crossed line between democratic and military politics. The all too obvious failures of the nation’s first few years had tainted the Awami League’s rhetoric of socialism and secularism, allowing Zia to promote a reactionary turn towards more conservative values, underscored by a populist appeal

in Class, ethnicity and religion in the Bengali East End
The doctrine of ‘religion’ in Islam and the idea of ‘rights’ in the West
Hisham A. Hellyer

responsibilities rather than rights. Others argue that the rights discourse ignores responsibilities, in favour of rights. Both assertions are simplistic, and ignore the philosophical systems of both discourses. Another confusion arises around the notion of secularism. In the West, secularism is a subject of great controversy, in terms of what it requires by way of specific policies and legislative tools. The very notion of secularism is alien to the Islamic worldview and has not yet found a sustainable elaboration within it. This is not to say one cannot be found but it would

in Religion and rights
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Street photography, humanism and the loss of innocence
Justin Carville

legislative measures to defend Irish society against growing secularism. As he observes, Newman believed ‘that spiritual life and individual faith were sustained by social habits that could be damaged by removal from a society within which religious norms prevailed. Urban life and the impersonal social structures of modernity made community intangible and faith difficult’ (Fanning 2014: 49). Lange’s photo-​essay, with its attention focused on rural Ireland and the timeless condition of familial and communal relations oriented around the church, offered a comforting image

in Tracing the cultural legacy of Irish Catholicism

College clergy failed to deliver ‘a vigorous evangelistic effort’ so that ‘secularism and indifference advanced’ in the town. 61 Certainly, a rising tide of fornicators, drunkards, and non-attenders was reported to the Bishop at visitations: in 1581 there were eight notorious drunkards and six adulterers, while one person was presented for allowing others to drink in his house during church services; but in 1598, six were reported as keeping a bawdy house, eleven as common drunkards, and fifty for fornication or

in Manchester Cathedral
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‘This is your hour’
John Carter Wood

shaped by various (not exclusively British) traditions and defined against ‘secularism’; and a public (intellectual) context marked by certain forms of action and authority. British Histories of ecumenical thought have often focused on its transnational elements. This approach can be enlightening; however, it is important to attend to the specificities of the national contexts in which most Christian groups and individuals lived the far greater parts of their lives and formed their worldviews. Rather

in This is your hour