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The Oxford Amnesty Lectures 2006
Editor: Chris Miller

'Terror' is a diffuse notion that takes no account of local particularities and 'war on terror' is a contradiction in terms. This book is based on the lectures that were given on the subject in Oxford in 2006. Amnesty has described 'war on terror' as a war on human rights. It is also a contest of narratives: stories that the protagonists tell about themselves, about their enemies, and about what is happening now. The book considers how the recent actions of the United States have stressed and stretched two areas of international law: the right of self-defence, and the rules of international humanitarian law. State terrorism, with a bit of careful spin, can be reclassified as counter-terrorism, in other words as inherently good in the same way that terrorism is inherently bad. The book engages with the politico-conceptual difficulties of distinguishing between war and terrorism. The interface and tensions between the human rights tradition and the Islamic tradition, particularly Islamic law, is discussed. The intensification of Western repression against Islamic thinkers or activists has at times been coupled with policies that seemed designed to change the religious trajectory of society. The sexualization of torture is only one way in which the 'war on terror' has delineated who is (and who is not) human. Religion, human rights, and trauma narratives are three other mechanisms for rationalizing suffering. The book also discusses the subject of censuring reckless killing of innocent civilians by the issue of fatwas by Muslim teachers.

Sexual violence and trauma in the ‘war on terror’
Joanna Bourke

shouldn’t be in the military … Women are more vicious than men’. 20 This approach encourages an emphasis on Lynndie England’s pregnancy and the alleged fact that the female perpetrators were ‘smitten with [Charles] Graner’, the man most frequently seen in the photographs. 21 A more sociologically infused perspective posits that female perpetrators of sexual violence expose the folly of a world that deprecates femininity and views bodies (particularly female ones) as commodities. Women come to adopt the same attitude toward, all bodies. As women become similar

in ‘War on terror’
Alison Spillane

public expenditure cutbacks, and on women’s position in both the formal labour market and in relation to unrecognised care work. It will also look at the issues of domestic and sexual violence against women, the female body as a site of struggle during the crisis, and the ways in which women have organised to resist austerity. Precarious work As regards the labour market, there are contradictions in the way in which women are being treated during the current crisis. While some women, such as lone parents, find themselves being forced out of the home to seek waged work

in Ireland under austerity
Shane Kilcommins, Susan Leahy, Kathleen Moore Walsh, and Eimear Spain

positive trends are evident among victims of this category of crime, reporting levels remain strikingly low. Statistics published by the RCNI demonstrate that an increasing number of users of its service are reporting the crime committed against them to police, with 18% reporting in 2007 and 27% reporting in 2009 (Hanly et al., 2009 : 11). The number of victims of sexual violence reporting to police in 2014 had risen to 33% (RCNI, 2014 : 23). Interestingly, 3% reported exclusively to another formal authority including the Redress Board, Health Services Executive

in The victim in the Irish criminal process
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Jack Holland

better explored and depicted than in Mad Men , a show about marketing executives that focuses on the daily gendered discrimination of the American workplace, and which finds its grizzly culmination in rape. That such sexual violence is barely acknowledged, never mind pivotal, speaks to the relative normalisation of abuse as part of the everyday fabric of life in 1960s America. The ‘mad women’ of Mad Men may have been on the verge of second-wave feminism, but theirs is an experience that is, on the whole, deeply uncomfortable for the audience. 15 To watch the show

in Fictional television and American Politics
Jack Holland

(ed.), Breaking Bad and Philosophy , p. 9, summarising B. Faucette, ‘Taking Control: Male Angst and the Re-Emergence of Hegemonic Masculinity in Breaking Bad’, in Pierson (ed.), Breaking Bad and Philosophy , pp. 73–86. 47 Ibid . 48 Wille, ‘“I am the one who knocks!”’, p. 18. 49 Faucette, ‘Taking Control’. 50 Pearson, ‘Introduction’, p. 9. 51 Logan, Breaking Bad and Dignity . 52 Ibid . 53 S. Joy, ‘Sexual Violence in Serial Form: Breaking Bad Habits on TV’, Feminist Media Studies (2017), 2. See also A. Gunn, ‘I have a character issue

in Fictional television and American Politics
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Mundane methods and the extra-ordinary everyday
Sarah Marie Hall and Helen Holmes

disciplines, as part of the cultural and reflexive turns, and with wider social shift around feminist politics and the body (e.g. abortion, contraception and sexual violence). This ran concurrent with a ‘welling up’ of curiosity about the social implications of emotions (Davidson and Milligan, 2004 : 523), and recognition of their ‘power to transform the shape of our lives, expanding or contracting our horizons’ (Davidson, Bondi and Smith, 2007 : 1). What emerged was an attuned interest in not how the body and mind sit apart, but how they co-exist and converse. Emotions

in Mundane Methods
Shane Kilcommins, Susan Leahy, Kathleen Moore Walsh, and Eimear Spain

victim support organisations’ (Kilcommins et al., 2010 : 172). For victims who do not report, the various support organisations are an important source of information, advice and services. There are a wide variety of support organisations in Ireland that offer specialist support to victims of all types of crime. The most prominent support organisations are perhaps those that support victims of sexual violence (e.g. Rape Crisis Centres, or OneinFour, which supports adult survivors of child sexual abuse) or domestic abuse (e.g. Women's Aid, ADAPT or AMEN, which

in The victim in the Irish criminal process
Philip Norton

committees, reappointed at the start of each session. The House also makes use of temporary or ad hoc committees, appointed usually for the lifetime of a session. As we have noted, it uses ad hoc committees for post-legislative scrutiny. It also utilises them to examine particular issues. In the three sessions from 2014–15 to 2016–17, it appointed committees on affordable childcare, the Arctic, digital skills, social mobility, the built environment, sexual violence in conflict, charities, financial exclusion, and the long-term sustainability of the National Health Service

in Reform of the House of Lords
Jack Holland

lower than North Korea. 22 And, in a statistic that defies belief, at the height of the Syrian Civil War, Syrians were still likely to outlive residents of eight Baltimore neighbourhoods. 23 Children in Baltimore suffer some of the worst urban rates globally for sexual violence, post-traumatic stress disorder, substance abuse, and depression. Baltimore still has the highest incarceration rate in the country. 24 But, shockingly, in many respects this is a national story. By several measures, Baltimore is not an outlier: it is a typical city for racial income

in Fictional television and American Politics