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The crisis of masculinity in Ian McEwan’s early fiction
Justine Gieni

of McEwan’s early work, it is frequently male protagonists who commit sexual violence to gain power. As evidenced in ‘Homemade’, The Cement Garden , and ‘In Between the Sheets’, it is male characters that feel ineffectual, vulnerable or weak and are thus driven by an apparent cultural imperative with the goal of gaining patriarchal dominance. In this way, these characters expose the fragility of the

in Incest in contemporary literature
Open Access (free)
Disrupting the critical genealogy of the Gothic
Jenny DiPlacidi

understandings of it as law instituted by society. Incest, a sexual act associated with transgression, violations of power and violence, has readily been conflated with sexual violence in Gothic scholarship and consigned to one of two gendered plots. Anne K. Mellor, for example, argues that ‘the Gothic novel written by men presents the father’s incestuous rape of his daughter as the perverse desire of the older

in Gothic incest
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Miles Leeson and Emma V. Miller

down in full’ his ideas ‘[i]‌n defiance of my colleagues’. 28 However Freud might have come to his decision to so dramatically alter his professional stance, as Florence Rush asserts in her critique of Freud, ‘The Freudian Cover-Up’, his choice went on to profoundly influence the way that reports of sexual violence in the home were received by professionals and the general public alike. 29 Proving the occurrence of incest

in Incest in contemporary literature
Creative women and daydreaming in Margo Lanagan’s Tender Morsels (2008)
Emma V. Miller

more than unavoidable and irritating ‘waste’ by-products that must be destroyed. 50 However, by recognising that the threat of sexual violence is part of the symbolic order, Branza, unlike her mother, escapes the ideology that attempts to ensnare her by expecting her to respond as a victim and succumb to the advances of the gang of boys. Instead she aims to realise her own desire by fighting back and

in Incest in contemporary literature
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Heterocosms and bricolage in Moore’s recent reworkings of Lovecraft
Matthew J.A. Green

share with From Hell and Voice a meditation on the interrelationship of the occult and the repressive violence of the law (‘The Courtyard’), a concern over the psychic significance of landscape and geography (‘Zaiman’s Hill’) and an anxiety over the ambivalent associations amongst magic, sexual violence and insanity (‘Recognition’). These stories have been republished in

in Alan Moore and the Gothic Tradition
Open Access (free)
Thefts, violence and sexual threats
Jenny DiPlacidi

reclaim the textual property of women writers and ownership over a literary tradition. 58 It is, indeed, impossible to overlook so central a focus of Radcliffe’s texts, particularly when the themes of property are intriguingly united with threats of incestuous sexual violence, which we have already seen in play in Parsons’s work. E. J. Clery states that Radcliffe, ‘by regularly endowing her female

in Gothic incest
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Angela Carter and European Gothic
Rebecca Munford

’s work is her stylistic investment in male-authored representations of self-sacrificing femininity and sexual violence in her novels of the 1960s and 1970s, what Elaine Jordan describes as the ‘apparent contradiction between Carter’s feminist “line” and her exploitation of a dangerous reactionary fascination – heterosexual desire in thrall to soft pornography and sado-masochism’ ( 1992 : 123). It is not surprising, then, that in

in Decadent Daughters and Monstrous Mothers
Rebecca Munford

potential of genre as an analytical tool, she argues that ‘Sade describes the condition of women in the genre of the pornography of sexual violence’ ( SW 26) because sexual relations ‘render explicit the nature of social relations in the society in which they take place and, if described explicitly, will form a critique of those relations, even if that is not and never has been the intention of the

in Decadent Daughters and Monstrous Mothers
Matthew J. A. Green

sexuality within exploitative power structures, evidenced by child prostitution and molestation (III.25.3.iii–iv, I.9.3–5). V for Vendetta represents the specifically political use of sexual violence in its opening scene, where the narrowly averted gang rape and murder of Evey operates as a metonym for the state’s violation of its subject’s bodies and

in Alan Moore and the Gothic Tradition
Ecocriticism in the eighteenth century Gothic novel
Lisa Kröger

my eyes; … she tells me what I see is a Benedictine monastery’ (559). Justine is lulled into a sense of safety by the young shepherdess and the grazing sheep. Yet the scenes that follow of sexual violence and both physical and mental torture call into question Radcliffe’s binary assumption that the country equals virtue and the city equals vice. This point is further supported by the fact that every

in Ecogothic