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Poulantzas, Laclau, Hall
Paul K. Jones

and superstructure’ metaphor, which was discussed in Chapter 3 . 8 The 1859 usage of the metaphor refers to the constituents of an ‘epochal’ mode of production as the base: forces and relations of production as distinct from an ‘ideological superstructure’. In The Brumaire , however, the metaphor is used in both that sense and a localized micropolitical sense in discussing the relationship between social classes and the ‘political superstructure’ which is also repeatedly metaphorized as a theatrical stage

in Critical theory and demagogic populism
Open Access (free)
Strangers among citizens

citizenry. In an age of increased mobility and with diversified legal statuses, citizenship, contrary to expectation, is not losing its grip (Shachar et al. , 2017 ). Instead, the concept of citizenship has undergone significant transformations both in theory and in practice. These transformations have transgressed the previous boundaries of its definition as simply a membership in a sovereign polity. The theory of citizenship, as conceptualised in the classic text by Thomas Humphrey Marshall, Citizenship and Social Class ( 1949 ), has been

in The Fringes of Citizenship
Open Access (free)
Frontier patterns old and new
Philip Nanton

consumption. Smoking marijuana, for example, has been recognised to be ‘widely prevalent in the lower socio-economic groups in Jamaica for more than one hundred years’ (Thorburn, 1974 : 19). During this time the drug has acquired a long history of use as a spiritual herb among the Rastafarian religious sect and in more recent years its use has spread across the range of social classes. Possession of 2 oz or

in Frontiers of the Caribbean
Paul K. Jones

Poulantzas, Political Power and Social Classes , 188–189. 45 Roger Eatwell, ‘Populism and Fascism’, in The Oxford Handbook of Populism , ed. Cristóbal Rovira Kaltwasser et al. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017). 46 This point remains controversial. See for example, the respectively sociological and

in Critical theory and demagogic populism
Human rights violations by ‘private’ transnational actors
Gunther Teubner

approach. The totality of society consists of the social classes that spring from economic structural contradictions. Justice will only become possible once the classless society is born out of their antagonistic conflicts. In social-democratic welfare-state conceptions, the parts of society, that is the classes, are transformed into socio-economic strata. Here, too, a divisional view dominates, especially

in Critical theory and legal autopoiesis
Abstract only
Democratic state, capitalist society, or dysfunctional differentiation?
Darrow Schecter

forced them into exile in 1933. It can be conjectured that this condition of simultaneous inclusion and exclusion contributes to the methodological rigour, originality, and depth of their writings. It can also be conjectured that there is no social class, gender, ethnic category, or any other group in contemporary society that is both integrated and excluded in quite the same way that the Frankfurt School thinkers were during the interwar period of the previous century. But maybe the condition of simultaneous inclusion/​exclusion is simply part of what it now means to

in Critical theory and sociological theory
On mediated unity and overarching legal-political form
Darrow Schecter

Critical theory and sociological theory the allocation of posts and organisation of responsibility is guided by meritocratic criteria and standard qualifications, rather than by personal connections or private debts and obligations. In principle, there should also be a unified legal system that is valid for all citizens regardless of status, social class, religion, race, gender, and so on, which is empowered to raise revenues through taxation on a similarly uniform, universally applicable basis. This of course meant the end of taxation by the church and other corporate

in Critical theory and sociological theory
Paul K. Jones

from the family. But the family itself, all its typical internal emotional relationships and the educational ideals it embodies, are in turn conditioned by the social and class background of the family; in short they are conditioned by the social structure in which it is rooted. (For example: the emotional relationships between father and son are quite different in the family that is part of a bourgeois, patriarchal society than they are in a family that is part of a matriarchal society.) The family is the medium through which the society or the social class stamps

in Critical theory and demagogic populism
Paul K. Jones

McGuigan's otherwise well-informed account of British cultural studies, his primary target, misses the fact that the culture industry, as opposed to ‘mass culture’, concerns of the Frankfurt School were echoed within that tradition at its outset, where these issues were formulated primarily in terms of social class. Contrary to McGuigan's account, Williams's position was never a ‘populist’ one. It was designed to contest what he later called the ‘arrière-garde’ position of T.S. Eliot's Notes Towards a Definition of Culture (1949) and the proto-populist position of

in Critical theory and demagogic populism
Peter J. Verovšek

across social class groups.’ 78 However, this will require the citizens of the northern member-states, who have managed to ride out the crisis, to express greater solidarity for the economic and social suffering recent events have caused individuals in the south. It is only in this way that the more long-range hopes for a brighter, European future based on a common historical imaginary and the renewed pro-integration leadership of a younger generation that grew up on a continent of open borders can come to fruition. Notes 1 M. Horkheimer , ‘ Traditional and

in Memory and the future of Europe