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Carmen M. Mangion

(Berkeley: University of California Press, 1999); Susan O’Brien, ‘Making Catholic Spaces: Women, Décor, and Devotion in the English Catholic Church, 1840–1900’, in Diana Woods, ed., The Church and the Arts (Oxford: Blackwell Publishers, 1992), pp. 449–64. Susan O’Brien presents convincing evidence of how women religious played an important role in promoting the devotion to female saints through donations of statues, pictures and stained glass. 126 Working identities As discussed earlier, perhaps the most striking evidence of women’s work as missionaries was their

in Contested identities
Cara Delay

Irish Catholic hierarchy encouraged the building of Marian shrines and altars across the island.14 Chapels and cathedrals featured elaborate statues of the Virgin. Some also displayed Marian grottoes.15 Stained-glass art featured in Irish Catholic chapels displayed devotion to the Virgin; popular designs by Harry Clarke, for example, focused on ‘the Visitation, Assumption, Coronation, Presentation in the Temple and Immaculate Conception’.16 Cathedrals, schools, convents, and hospitals, including Dublin’s Mater Misericordia, took Mary’s name or titles. The Blessed

in Irish women and the creation of modern Catholicism, 1850–1950
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Cara Delay

. The spectacular ‘triple mullioned window … filled with stained glass’ that claimed a space over the altar was donated by a Mrs Morris.121 In 1850, Miss O’Sullivan of Thurles bequeathed money to several local convents as well as £5 to the Thurles chapel in her will.122 According to Bridie O’Brien, her own grandmother single-handedly planned and oversaw the construction of a new chapel in Terryglass, Tipperary, in 1873.123 And women also took charge of decorating the interior of the chapel. In Kilbarron, County Tipperary, when a new chapel was constructed, [a young

in Irish women and the creation of modern Catholicism, 1850–1950