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Gervase Rosser

vision of the town community. 10 The monumental inscriptions embedded in the walls of the church of Long Melford announce at once the pride of successful wool-merchants and their desire to be remembered as contributors to a common religious purpose [ 110 ]. A stained-glass window in a York church, which combines text and pictures in a visionary prayer on the end of the

in Towns in medieval England
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Andrew Brown and Graeme Small

Low Countries: E. van den Neste, Tournois, joutes, pas d’armes dans les villes de Flandre à la fin du Moyen Age (1300 – 1486 ) (Paris, 1996 ), p. 54. 100 And for more permanent symbols of ducal power placed in urban churches, see the gifts of stained

in Court and civic society in the Burgundian Low Countries c.1420–1530
Andrew Brown and Graeme Small

themselves which served as more personalised kinds of memorial. Of the many media chosen, stained glass appears most frequently in the ducal accounts [see also 21 ]. Motives behind such gifts were multiple. Some were votive, made following a specific vow to a particular saint out of thanks for saintly intercession. 27 More generally, the dukes, like other

in Court and civic society in the Burgundian Low Countries c.1420–1530
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Andrew Brown and Graeme Small

. George and Andrew) were visible reminders of his authority, much like the stained-glass windows that bore his image in civic churches [ 26 ]. 13 Even the sounds that came from the palace brought to mind the prince’s immanence and majesty: at Ghent, the lions’ cage was situated close by the entry of the Prinsenhof , its occupants there for passers-by to see

in Court and civic society in the Burgundian Low Countries c.1420–1530
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Monasticism in late medieval England, c. 1300–1535
Martin Heale

were adorned with wall paintings, stained-glass windows, carved and sculpted images, screenwork, altarpieces and tapestries, all of which underscored and elaborated the meaning of the liturgy and the Mass to the community [ 15 , 21 ]. The later middle ages saw great expenditure on all these embellishments [ 13 ], most of which have subsequently been lost. But occasionally their devotional impact

in Monasticism in late medieval England, c. 1300–1535
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In search of pre-Reformation English spirituality
R. N. Swanson

Mural Paintings , Oxford, 1963 ; B. Coe, Stained Glass in England, 1150–1500 , London, 1981 . For salutary comment on the difficulties of ‘artistic’ material, B. Hamilton, Religion in the Medieval West , London, 1986 , pp. 72–3. Beyond the artefacts which survive, it is also necessary to integrate material which has been destroyed since (and sometimes because

in Catholic England