Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 240 items for :

  • "supernatural" x
  • Manchester Literature Studies x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Editor: Jana Funke

This book presents a wide range of previously unpublished works by Radclyffe Hall. These new materials significantly broaden and complicate critical views of Hall’s writings. They demonstrate the stylistic and thematic range of her work and cover diverse topics, including outsiderism, gender, sexuality, race, class, religion, the supernatural, and World War I. Together, these texts shed a new light on unrecognised or misunderstood aspects of Hall’s intellectual world. The volume also contains a substantial 20,000-word introduction, which situates Hall’s unpublished writings in the broader context of her life and work. Overall, the book invites a critical reassessment of Hall’s place in early twentieth-century literature and culture and offers rich possibilities for teaching and future research. It is of interest to scholars and undergraduate and postgraduate students in the fields of English literature, modernism, women’s writing, and gender and sexuality studies, and to general readers.

Abstract only
Caitlin Flynn

narrative grotesque, Alexander Montgomerie and Sir Patrick Hume of Polwarth’s later flytings, ‘Invectiues Capitane Allexander Montgomeree and Pollvart etcetera’ ( c . 1580–3), continue to develop the genre. These flyters amplify supernatural elements and create elaborate pseudo-medical taunts, thus showcasing a changing set of sensibilities and trends in Scottish writing in the later sixteenth century. Critics, such as Jacqueline Simpson, have focused on the burlesque and supernatural elements of the flyting, yet the

in The narrative grotesque in medieval Scottish poetry
Vernon Lee, Eugene Lee-Hamilton, and ‘the spell of the fragment’
Catherine Maxwell

Lee’s later tale ‘St. Eudæmon’ in any detail, it traces the origins and development of both writers’ interest in Venus, focusing attention on their treatment of a particular image of a Venus cast up from the deep and its significance for their work. The appearance of this specific image has an affinity with Lee’s presentation of the supernatural and her aesthetic interest in the fragment and the incomplete, both of which belong to a Romantic and Post-Romantic visionary tradition. Ideas and images rehearsed in this opening, such as the often-fragmentary classical

in Second sight
Annalisa Oboe and Elisa Bordin

, and of the possible or the imagined beside and over the mimetic. He thus favours a discursive transcoding of reality, one that freely uses figuration and rhetorical interventions to build a more provocative representational strategy, which may include elements of different artistic genres, such as melodrama, or noir, or the supernatural and the surreal of Bollywood cinema. Words, images, and words and images together, may carry enormous potential for a more inclusive ethics. In 2009, the same year as his reflections on

in Chris Abani
Abstract only
The first wife’s response
Caitlin Flynn

flyting characteristics, and the abrupt shift between registers destabilises the more general genre categories associated with the poem. Moreover, the veil of secrecy inherent to the women’s discourse and the implication of drunkenness amplifies the humorous aspect of scandalous and unrestrained revelation. This narrative grotesque prompts the audience to question the premise of the demande , the norms of courtly behaviour, and feminine expression and sexuality. Next the wife introduces demonic and supernatural motifs

in The narrative grotesque in medieval Scottish poetry
Jack Baker

attitudes – rejecting supernatural occurrences, but deeply attuned to the power of scripture and ritual – offer an intriguing foil for Robinson's enigmatic protagonist. Ames, too, is more interested in the poetry of life than in abstract philosophic questioning. He reports uneasy conversations with his atheist brother, and, elsewhere, evinces an impatience with doctrinal questions: ‘I'm not going to force some theory on a mystery and make foolishness of it, just because that is what people who talk about it normally do’ ( Gilead 173). Though a daunting weight of

in Marilynne Robinson
Abstract only
Temporal dissonance and narrative voice
Caitlin Flynn

thinkers such as Boccaccio, Landino, and Ficino. Circe and the three Fates sharpen this aspect by means of their explicitly prophetic and magical/supernatural associations; and, not coincidentally, Circe famously transfigured men into animals. In her study of affect in Palyce Bernau explores the significance of the consecutive divine processions. She observes, ‘lists and affect are placed in different forms of relation to one another, offering a textured exploration of the dreamer’s fluctuating affect when

in The narrative grotesque in medieval Scottish poetry
Autobiography in the third person
Ruth Evans

very well her fellow Christians’ scepticism, which is based in the big Other of the sceptical procedures of canonisation and attitudes to miraculous phenomena. 35 At stake is the issue not of ‘belief’ in miracles but of discernment of spirits: is the origin of her bellowing natural or supernatural? But third-person narration allows Kempe to assume an authority for her unshakeable trust in ‘what sche felt’, another of the Book 's key tropes. The distancing produced by the sarcastic use of anaphora – ‘summe seyd … sum

in Encountering The Book of Margery Kempe
Abstract only
A poetics of passing out
Naomi Booth

as your audience is revived. My goal was to write a new form of horror story, something based on the ordinary world, without supernatural monsters or magic. Guts, and the book that contained it, would be a trapdoor down into some place dark. A place only you could go, alone. Only books have that power. 7 Palahniuk's description of his

in Swoon
Shakespearean swoons and unreadable body-texts
Naomi Booth

supernatural gave epilepsy an ominous connotation and encouraged interpretations of the illness as a sign of moral corruption (8–9). The middle ages into the Renaissance saw continued association of epilepsy with depravity but, with increased conversion of the populace to Christianity, epilepsy's connections to divine prophecy ( divinatio)  (150) and ecstatic possession (86) became more pronounced. 16

in Swoon