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Bill Alexander and Antony Sher
Boika Sokolova
,
Kirilka Stavreva
, and
J. C. Bulman

staging of the trial scene, the acid test of a production’s credibility. At a key moment, when Portia conceded that Shylock was entitled to his pound of flesh, the preparations for surgery were chillingly unconventional. The Duke, habited like a Catholic Monsignor with a large silver cross around his neck, fell to his knees to intone a Salve Regina ; Bassanio, dissolved in tears, threw himself prostrate before

in Shakespeare in Performance

This book is the first ever concordance to the rhymes of Spenser’s epic. It gives the reader unparalleled access to the formal nuts and bolts of this massive poem: the rhymes which he used to structure its intricate stanzas.

As well as the main concordance to the rhymes, the volume features a wealth of ancillary materials, which will be of value to both professional Spenserians and students, including distribution lists and an alphabetical listing of all the words in The Faerie Queene. The volume breaks new ground by including two studies by Richard Danson Brown and J. B. Lethbridge, so that the reader is given provocative analyses alongside the raw data about Spenser as a rhymer. Brown considers the reception of rhyme, theoretical models and how Spenser’s rhymes may be reading for meaning. Lethbridge in contrast discusses the formulaic and rhetorical character of the rhymes.

Greg Wells

medicine’ (i.e. a practitioner of medicine) in the records of the Stratford-upon-Avon Ecclesiastical Court (also known as the Bawdy Court). This is evidence of Hall being licensed in medicine by a court which had authority to license him when the bishop was not present. The record includes ‘He did not appear. Pardoned.’ Immediately below Hall’s name are three ‘professors of surgery’: Isaac Hitchcox, John Nason (similarly ‘pardoned’) and Edward Wilkes (‘Let him be cited for the next court.’). They would all have had to present their licences before the ecclesiastical

in John Hall, Master of Physicke
Abstract only
Peter J. Smith

which they of course send back by return. 1 Thy worst. I fart at thee. 2 I Illustration 1 shows the surgery of Dr Panurgus. A young well-dressed aristocrat, in slashed doublet, earring, sword and spurs, lies on a low table, his head entering a furnace in order ‘to purg the Gallants Braine.’ Floating up from the chimney

in Between two stools
Making room for France
Richard Hillman

, of love, of sentiment). 22 The taking of the rib serves to stigmatise, not Eve, but Adam, on whom God performs curative surgery. 23 Contrary to embodying the ‘woe of man’, she joins with him to form the ‘[s]ource de tout bon heur, amoureux Androgyne’ (source of all happiness, the loving Androgyne). 24 From an intertextual point of view, then, the anonymous play is shown to ‘protest too much’ when it insists on an unambiguous resolution and cleaves to a straightforward misogynistic – coded as comic – trajectory. The picture is not nearly so categorical in The

in The Shakespearean comic and tragicomic
Michael D. Friedman
and
Alan Dessen

therefore from both of these productions was the hand-inhand offer from Marcus and Lucius to fall and the positive response from the Romans below, so no attention was devoted to such issues as legitimacy and the transfer of power. The most extensive changes were provided by Brian Bedford in his Stratford Festival Canada production. In what amounts to radical surgery rather than mere cutting, Bedford (like Brook) first omitted the opening beat involving Lucius, the Goths, and Aaron (ll. 1–16) and then, more significantly

in Titus Andronicus
Kate McLuskie
and
Kate Rumbold

surgeon operates on. (Tony Clifton, 9 April) I’m a writer, but when it comes to visual art I wouldn’t trust my decisions as far as I could throw me, so what value would my opinion have? You may as well ask me my opinion on how to perform brain surgery. (Darren Ross, 19 April) This recurring analogy of the tyre

in Cultural value in twenty-first-century England
Rhyme and stanza form in Spenser and Chaucer
Richard Danson Brown

was right faire, when so her face She list discouer, and of goodly stature (IV.ii.44) This is an example of the ‘foot surgery’ which Craig Berry diagnoses in Spenser’s continuation of the Squire’s Tale : ‘a poet such as Spenser – with an unusually fine ear but a sixteenth-century understanding of Middle English pronunciation – could not help but feel a roughness in Chaucer’s versification’, and, I would add, in some of his rhyming. 30 Spenser’s ‘creatures’ are those of early modern

in Rereading Chaucer and Spenser
Rhyme, meaning and experience
Richard Danson Brown

. Thereto she was right faire, when so her face She list discouer, and of goodly stature (IV.ii.44) This is an example of the ‘foot surgery’ which Craig Berry diagnoses in Spenser's continuation of ‘The Squire's Tale’: ‘a poet such as Spenser – with an unusually fine ear but a sixteenth-century understanding of Middle English pronunciation – could not help but feel a roughness in Chaucer's versification’, and, I would add, in his some of his rhyming. 73 Spenser's ‘creatures’ are

in The art of The Faerie Queene
Anne Sweeney

at the wounding of the English Church, or reflects Continental Catholicism’s outrage at recent English actions on what it could reasonably consider its own soil in the Low Countries (lines 19–20). Wounds had been dealt both in England and abroad that would require much bloody surgery to remedy; Southwell was making painful demands of his readership. As in the Jonas imagery in ‘Christs sleeping

in Robert Southwell