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Sian Barber

using fan material from 1953, you need to think about where it was published, who wrote it and who may have read it. If it was published in a fan magazine devoted to the attractions of American teen film stars and mainly written and consumed by teenage girls then this material obviously relates to a very specific audience. While valuable in helping us to understand the teenage audience, it cannot be used to offer conclusions about 1950s audiences as a whole. Similarly, if you are using critical reviews of a film from British newspapers like The Times or the Guardian

in Using film as a source
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1990s style and the perennial return of Goth
Catherine Spooner

staff and then the pupils of a school with the objective of making everyone conform and therefore happy The (female) alien is disguised as the new girl at the school, a stock character in the teen film narrative, who therefore is literally as alienated as the five teenagers she falls in with who eventually unmask and defeat her. These five are directly modelled on the archetypes of The Breakfast Club

in Fashioning Gothic bodies
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The double and the single woman
Catherine Spooner

the likes of Cosmopolitan, and espoused by Allie herself. Hedy’s first attempts to look like Allie are couched within the terms of the conventional ‘makeover’, a common feature of women’s magazines and also of films with a female target audience, from teen films such as Clueless (1995) and She’s All That (1998) to blockbusters such as the Sandra Bullock vehicle Miss

in Fashioning Gothic bodies