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Should I use them?
Andrew Balmer and Anne Murcott

. In other words, a rhetorical question can be used to signpost an important point in the argument. In the following extract, a student adds a rhetorical question to the end of a paragraph that appears in the middle of her essay. The essay question asks whether 1970s feminists were right to see women as being oppressed by marriage and child-rearing. Up to this point the student has been concerned with arguing that medical technologies, such as the pill and other forms of contraception, have given women more control over childbearing. She uses her rhetorical question

in The craft of writing in sociology
Margaret Brazier and Emma Cave

promoted in the first place and withdrawn from the market a few years later, amid bitter allegations that the drug in question caused injury and even death, is long. Opren, 3 the benzodiazepine tranquillisers such as Valium, 4 human growth hormone, 5 the pill itself, 6 the painkiller Vioxx 7 and most recently, the type-2 diabetes drug Avandia 8 are but a random sample of the better-known cases. Allegations of gross profit-making by multinational drug companies have proliferated. 9 Pharmaceutical companies have been criticised for testing products destined for the

in Medicine, patients and the law (sixth edition)
Systems and structures in an age of upheaval
Torbjørn L. Knutsen

neighbourhood of Los Angeles in August 1965. What could explain these changes? Demographers pointed to the sharp increase in fertility rates some eighteen to twenty years earlier, in the wake of World War II. They also noted the equally sharp drop of fertility rates that occurred in the 1960s, after the introduction of the oral contraceptive pill. ‘The Pill’ made it possible to regulate the human reproductive cycle. It revolutionized female freedom because it gave women a new control over their bodies. This in turn paved the way for a sexual and feminist revolution

in A history of International Relations theory (third edition)
Oliver Daddow

the world, Blair considered the Iraq issue and set out his rationale for choosing to ally London so closely with Washington in the emerging rounds of UN diplomacy on Iraq’s WMD programme (Blair 2002b). John Kampfner’s sources told him that the key Iraq segments of the speech were inserted by Blair after last-minute discussions with his Number 10 chief of staff Jonathan Powell. ‘They did it to head off dissent within the party – or in the words of one who was involved in the speech “to sweeten the pill of Iraq”’ (Kampfner 2004: 213). Here, then, was Blair using a set

in New Labour and the European Union
Abstract only
Economics, influence and security
Oliver Daddow

want. Blair and Brown believed that the precondition to winning the argument about the EU was altering subterranean British attitudes to matters ‘European’ more generally. Meanwhile, sweetening the pill of British membership and clearing the way for potential further engagement with the EU across a range of policy sectors meant bringing home to the British people what the EU meant to them in economic, influence and security terms. In Lance Price’s words above, the ‘crude appeal’ of ‘jobs plus…’ was the propaganda part of the message Blair and Brown put out to alter

in New Labour and the European Union
Margaret Brazier and Emma Cave

infallible contraceptive has yet to be invented. 7 Contraceptives, such as the pill and the IUD (intrauterine device), carry a price tag. They pose some risk to women’s health. Contraception is a medical as well as a social issue. And it largely concerns women, since except for the still experimental male ‘pill’, men must choose between the condom and vasectomy. The more sophisticated contraceptives which pose medical risk are used by women. A doctor advising a woman on contraception owes her the same duties as in any other area of medicine. He must offer her competent

in Medicine, patients and the law (sixth edition)
Abstract only
Brian McFarlane and Anthony Slide

Featuring more than 6,500 articles, including over 350 new entries, this fifth edition of The Encyclopedia of British Film is an invaluable reference guide to the British film industry. It is the most authoritative volume yet, stretching from the inception of the industry to the present day, with detailed listings of the producers, directors, actors and studios behind a century or so of great British cinema.

Brian McFarlane's meticulously researched guide is the definitive companion for anyone interested in the world of film. Previous editions have sold many thousands of copies, and this fifth instalment will be an essential work of reference for universities, libraries and enthusiasts of British cinema.

in The Encyclopedia of British Film